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Prisoners
M - N
 

In many cases, prisoners are referred to by surname only in the source material, making it difficult to know exactly who the individual may have been. This will have led to some duplication in the lists. Check for an individual under their full name, but also under the surname as well.
 
If you can link any of these anonymous surnames to listings with a full name, please contact me so that I can amend the entry.
 

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M
 
Maas
 
Maas was listed in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.45) as being a member of the Ruhleben Tennis Association.
 
 
James MacAvoy (also McAvoy)
 
James MackAvoy was a fireman on the 'Oswestry', originally from 15 Rawdon Road, Wallsend, and was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 4. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

M. MacDermott
 
M. MacDermott was listed in The Times of January 8th 1916 ("Released Civilians" p.5, col. D) as one of 69 men released from Ruhleben on Thursday, January 6th, 1916, who subsequently travelled to Flushing for their return trip to England.
 
 
John MacDonald (also McDonald)
 
John MacDonald was a fireman on the 'Sprightly', originally from Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 9. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
He may be the unnamed McDonald noted below as playing in a football tournament in the camp.
 
 
Terence MacGovern
 
Terence MacGovern was a fireman on the 'Trevider', originally from Gubnafarna, Swanlinbar, Co. Cavan, Ireland, and was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 22. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

James Lang MacGregor
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/73 regarding a request from Mrs. Marie MacGregor of Sussex, wife of Ruhleben prisoner James Lang MacGregor, of Charlery, for steps to be taken to persuade her husband to send her a deposit book with written authority to withdraw money. Further documents at FO383/75 contain a claim for loss of property sustained during the bombardment of Charleroi, Belgium.
 
 

E. C. Macintosh
 
E. C. Macintosh was listed in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.45) as being a member of the Ruhleben Tennis Association.
 
Macintosh is further noted in issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917) as having satisfied the examiners at the London Matriculation Examination, held in the camp in December 1916.
 
 
Peter Carl MacKay (1881 - 1965)
 
Peter Carl MacKay was an internee who was also known by the name "Prince Monolulu". Prior to his incarceration at Ruhleben he had been working on the Continent, mostly with travellling circuses and racing stables.  His autobiography "I Gotta Horse" contains a few uncomplimentary references to his stay in Ruhleben.  From the 1920s onwards he was a familiar figure at British race meetings, noted for his tips, colourful clothes and large feathered headdress. Many thanks to Elizabeth Beasley, daughter of internee Jack Griggs, for sharing this information in November 2007, which she obtained from Ruhleben memorabilia in her possession.
 
An article on Mackay was printed in Ancestors magazine in August 2008, written by John Pearson. Of his time in Ruhleben there is little mention, apart from the following:
On the outbreak of war in 1914, Monolulu was held at Ruhleben camp for Allied civilian internees just outside Berlin before being repatriated via Copenhagen back to Britain after the Armistice.
(Many thanks to Ancestors' editor Simon Fowler).
 

Monolulu in 1936 with two pearly kings at Epsom Derby

D. MacKenzie
 
D. MacKenzie was a steward on the Sappho who was interned in Ruhleben. Marcus Bateman's site lists him as having been from Fore Street in Fowey.
 
In March 2008, Mackenzie's grandson David contacted me with the following:

I am interested because my grandfather spent the whole of ww1 there. He was a merchant seaman and his ship the S.S. Sappho was impounded, I think at Hamburg at the start of the war.

The Sappho is mentioned in the book A Prison Camp Society by J.Davidson Ketchum, recording the first death in the camp on the 27th Nov 1914 by a member of the crew.

I'm afraid I know nothing of his time there, he could speak two or three languages, possibly learnt while there, he was certainly radicalised, probably by events witnessed at the end of the war in Germany.

My Aunt told me the family story that when he arrived home, he was wearing Anthony Eden's brother's trousers!.

I have a crew list for the Sappho signed by the crew on 10th July 1914. I also have a photo of the crew including my grandfather taken in Ruhleben 1916.

(Many thanks to David).

 
 
W. F. MacKenzie
 
W. F. MacKenzie was noted in the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.6) as having replaced L. G. Beaumont, who had returned to England on March 19th 1916, as captain of Barrack 5.
 
A Mackenzie was also noted in the Scotsman of May 12th 1915 as having provided popular songs at the camp's first Burns Night celebration ("A Burns Celebration in a German Prison", p.14).
 
 

Richard Thos. Mackey
 
Richard Thos. Mackey was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."

Three separate postcards from R. J. Mackey, whilst in Ruhleben, sent to a Mrs Mackey at 13 Sophia Street, Seaham Harbour, Durham, England, were placed for sale on E-Bay in August 2005. The date on the cards is illegible due to the low res JPEG image, but one of the cards tells us that Mackey was a prisoner staying within Barrack 9, whilst another depicts the Ruhleben Sports Day from August 1917, and the 75 yards Veterans Race, therevy dating it later in Mackey's stay.
 
A Christmas postcard sent by Mackey in 1915 has also been put for sale on the internet. The card has the phrase "Xmas 1915, Ruhleben Bei Spandau, With Heartiest Xmas and New Year's Wishes, From R. J. Mackey". There is no further information about Mackey on the JPEG picture of the card as advertised on E-Bay in August 2005.

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A Christmas postcard from 1916 was also placed on auction in August 2005. The card was again addressed to Mrs Mackey at Seaham Harbour. The card depicts two priosners looking longingly through the wire fence towards the rising sun, and the date 1917 written across its front, with the message on the front reading "Best Wishes From Ruhleben Christmas 1916".
 
Another sale on E-Bay (May 2006) of an internal RXD card, confirms Mackey as being in Barrack 9's loft.
 
In 1917, Mackey then sent at least two Christmas postcards to his family, one to Mrs Mackey, the other to Nancy Mackey, c/o Mrs Mackey, so presumably his daughter. These were also subsequently placed for sale on E-Bay in August 2005. One card is a picture of a priosner sitting smoking with the caption,"There's Hope" above him and the word "Troubles?" beneath him, followed by a Christmas message, "With All Good Wishes for Christmas and the Coming Year". The card to his daughter shows an elderly inmate, holding a sickle (within which is a cobweb), who is seated on an hourglass, which is half full/half empty. Above the man is the phrase "Englanderlager, Ruhleben, Germany, Xmas 1917", and below is the same Christmas greeting.
 
 

R. H. A. Mackie
 
R. H. A. Mackie was one of four gentlemen to have sent the Provost of Leith a postcard from Ruhleben in December 1914, as recorded in the Scotsman newspaper on 1/1/1915 (p.6). The other signatories were D. G. Munro, Matthew Duncan and Alexander T. Smith.
 
Mackie was also noted in the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p. 29) as having been a linesman at a football match between teams led by John Cameron and Steve Bloomer on March 3rd 1916, Cameron's side winning.
 
 
Geoffrey M. Mackness
 
Geoffrey M. Mackness was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 4. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

John N. Mackwell
 
John N. Mackwell was one of nine men over the age of 55 released from Ruhleben at the beginning of May 1916, as noted in the Times of May 9th 1916 ("British Prisoners from Germany", p.5, col.F).
 
 

MacLaren
 
In the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.8), MacLaren is listed as having performed as a cockney valet and butler in the Irish Players' rendition of the play "John Bull's Other Island".
 
 
Victor MacMahon
 
Thanks to Elizabeth Beasley for the following information supplied in November 2007. Victor MacMahon was one of Jack Griggs' stablemates in Barrack 11, Box 3.  He features in a couple of group photos held by Elizabeth, with one depicting him inside this Box, the other outside.
 
 

Sir Ernest MacMillan

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Sir Ernest MacMillan was a Canadian musician, who after his arrest in Nuremberg in 1915 was sent to Ruhleben, where he joined the musical society and the drama society. His first work at Ruhleben was to compose and conduct a revue entitled "Don't Laugh". This he followed by directing several shows, a pantomime performance of "Cinderella", and a performance of Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado", the music for which he transcribed from memory, with the help of four other prisoners. MacMillan also gave a series of lectures to other groups in the camp such as the Corner House, the Arts & Science Union and the Historical Circle.
 
In the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.26), MacMillan is noted as having recently given a performance of Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite in the camp, and of directing the 5th orchestral concert in the camp on February 20th 1916, which consisted of Mendelssohn's "Hebridean Overture".
 
In the musical notes section of the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.25), the following forthcoming contribution is listed for MacMillan:
Orchestra concerts will be given on every third Sunday, the intervening Sundays being devoted to chamber and vocal and instrumental recitals. The first three Symphony Concerts will be conducted by Messrs. Bainton, Weber and Macmillan, among the works promised being Schumann's Pianoforte Concerto (with Mr. Lindsay as soloist), and Mozart's Symphony in E. flat.
In the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), further reference is made to MacMillan's contribution:
"The gradual improvement of the orchestra under the splendid training of such fine musicians as Mr. Peebles Conn, Mr. McMilland and Mr. Weber paved the way for the regular orchestral concerts which have proved such a welcome feature of our captivity."
MacMillan left the camp at the end of the war, taking a ship to Leith in Scotland, and from there back to Canada. For more on MacMillan's story, visit a website detailing his experience at Ruhleben, by clicking on the following link: MacMillan
 
MacMillan's obituary in The Times of May 8th 1973 gves more background to his internment("Obituary: Sir Ernest MacMillan", p.18, col. F):
"While attending the Bayreuth Festival in 1914 war broke out and he was interned at Ruhleben until November 1918. He worked hard at his music as best he could and took part in many musical entertainments. At Christmas, 1916, he conducted a performance of The Mikado arranged by prisoners for officials of the United States Embassy who were visiting Ruhleben on behalf of the Allied Powers. While still interned he was awarded in absentia a DMus by Oxford University, his doctoral thesis being an overture and choral and orchestral setting of Swinburne's ode England..."
 
 

F. MacNamara
 
F. MacNamara was listed in The Times of January 8th 1916 ("Released Civilians" p.5, col. D) as one of 69 men released from Ruhleben on Thursday, January 6th, 1916, who subsequently travelled to Flushing for their return trip to England.
 
 
David D. MacNaught
 
David D. MacNaught was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 376 Upper Brook Street, Manchester.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, MacNaught is noted as being from 376 Upper Brook Street in Manchester. He was a chartereed accountant, arrested in Berlin on 9 NOV 1914, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 

Arthur Hugo Madden
 
Arthur Hugo Madden was a British horse trainer working in Hoppegarten, who was interned in Ruhleben at the beginning of November 1914, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper on 9/11/1914 (p.9), and in The Times of the same day ("British Interned in Germany", p. 7, col. E).
 
In April 2008 Jochem Heicke in Germany supplied me with the following additonal information:
Arthur Hugo Madden, trainer button # 67, brother of Otto (mentioned above), was born in Hoppegarten 9 April 1876 as son of Elijah Madden and Mathilda Lane.
 

Oscar Magnus
 
Amongst the inmates who gave lectures at Ruhleben, Francis Gribble, in his essay entitled "Leaves From a Ruhleben Notebook", noted:
"Mr. Prichard and Mr. Oscar Magnus were taking classes in Italian."
An "O. Magnus" was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

Gustav Mahnke
 
The National Archives hold documents from 1915 at FO383/71 concerning Gustav Mahnke, a British prisoner interned at Ruhleben. The file contains an application and arrangements for a remittance of £100.
 
 

H. Mahoney
 
H. Mahoney was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
NB: This may have been Henry Mahoney (see below).
 
 

Henry C. Mahoney
 
In the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915), on page 12, the following advert is to be found:
HENRY C. MAHONEY. Bar 5, Box 4.
ENGRAVER & DESIGNER.
Mahoney was noted in the Times of May 1st 1918 as being about to deliver a series illustrated lectures on his life in four German POW camps on behalf of the American YMCA to Australian camps in the West of England. He also wrote a book, "Sixteen Months in Four German Prisons" ("May Reviews", p.8, col. C).
 
 

Mahony
 
Mr. Mahony was an inmate at Ruhleben, as noted by Francis Gribble in his essay entitled "Leaves From a Ruhleben Notebook".
At the head of it (university) was the Science and Arts Union, organised by Mr. Hattfield, a distinguished chemist, with whom were associated, among others, Professor Delmer, whom I have already mentioned, Mr. Klingender, the Curator of the Gosling Museum, and my friend Mr. Prichard - a society to which our own Education Office has been sending a large supply of education books. At the base of it were philanthropists, like Mr. Mahony - who is, I believe, when at home a coadjutator of Sir Jesse Boot - teaching the alphabet and the multiplication table to the gentlemen of colour.
 
 

G. Mahuke
 
In an article in the Scotsman newspaper of October 27th 1915, G. Mahuke was listed as captain of Barrack 14 and of the tearoom ("Ruhleben Camp - Success of Civil Administration", p.9).
 
 

Samuel Makepeace
 
Samuel Makepeace, was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
Makepeace, of Bristol, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Makepeace was from 3 Brynland Avenue, Bristol, and was born in Bristol in 1875. He was a master mariner arrested on 1 AUG 1914 in Hamburg, and after a brief imprisonment on the hulks, was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 

Eustace Walter Malden
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/25 relating to Eustace Walter Malden, an inmate at Ruhleben.
 
A prisoner named Malden is also noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for the Varsities team against the Rest of Ruhleben, in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 

Maldon
 
In the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.15), Maldon is noted as having given a nautical lecture in the camp entitled "Drake".
 
 
Charles Maltby
 
C. Maltby is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Maltby was a merchant seaman on board the S. S. Castro, and interned in Barrack 5.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that maltby was from 15 William Street, Hull and born in Bridlington in 1890. He was a fireman arrested in Hamburg on 16 OCT 1914. After a spell on the hulks he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 

Mangatagi
 
Mangatagi was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Scotsman newspaper on January 31st 1917 ("British Civilians From Ruhleben", p.6).
 
 

R. Mann
 
R. Mann was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

Frederick J. Manning
 
Information on Fred Manning, former Ruhleben inmate and the editor of the first German lawn tennis and golfing journal, may be gleaned from a study by Dr. Heinner Gillmeister entitled "English Editors of German Sporting Journals at the Turn of the Century". The article states that Manning was noted in an 1894 directory for Lewisham as "Manning, Fredk. J, 34 Wisteria Road, Lewisham SE''. The article quotes th British "Lawn Tennis and badminton magazine":
Mr. Manning, it will be recalled, was formerly Editor of the German paper, Lawn Tennis und Golf.

Manning was also noted in The Times of November 9th 1931 as being one of the former inmates of Ruhleben present at a dinner meeting held in November 1931 by the Ruhleben Association, which was held to discuss an appeal to the House of Lords for the group's claims for compensation ("Reunion of Ex-Ruhleben Prisoners", p.17, col.D). Manning was noted as the secretary for the association.

In the seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp, a W. F. Manning is noted as the secretary of the camp's school, and it is stated that he is was a newspaper publisher (Sep 1915 p.17). It may be that W. F. Manning and F.J. Manning are somehow one and the same, both being newspaper editors.
 
The following is a card signed by Manning (from Barrack 10) at Christmas 1916, and posted to Mr and Mrs G. R. Thursfield, 147 Queen Victoria Street, London E.C.:

 
 
W. Manning
 
W. Manning was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 
Ernest Marchant
 
Ernest Marchant was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. He was described as a 22 year old cutter (zuschneider) who had been working in Berlin.
 
An Edward Marchant is listed in a separat file in FO 369/710 dated 11 OCT 1914. The list was communicated to the Foreign Office by a Nurse Coe. Beside the type name the following is handwritten in red ink: Mrs J. Marchant, 5 Lidlington Place, Amphill Square, London, N 10 (with thanks to Simon Fowler). It seems likely that this was Ernest with a misrecorded first name, though this may be incorrect.

In the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14), a gentleman named Marchant is noted as having played cricket for Barrack 8 against Barrack 2 in the Ruhleben Cricket League.

 

John Guyse Marchant

The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO 383/19 including an enquiry from John Burrell Marchant of St John's, in south east London, in respect of his son, John Guyse Marchant, a prisoner at Ruhleben.

In the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14), a gentleman named Marchant is noted as having played cricket for Barrack 8 against Barrack 2 in the Ruhleben Cricket League.

 

Louis A. Marcus
 
Louis A. Marcus is noted in several items of correspondence held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria as having been in Barrack 11 Box 14. The items are a letter (Soldatenbrief, Feldpost) dated 17 JUL 1915, an envelope from new York dated 27 JUL 1915 (photocopy) and a postcard from Rotterdam dated 3 NOV 1916 (photocopy. With thanks to Dr. Heber.
 
 

George Marcussen
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/66 regarding George Marcussen, a civilian prisoner at Ruhleben. The documents contain an enquiry from his father, H. Marcussen of Maida Vale, regarding his son's whereabouts, and a report that he had been transferred from Ruhleben to Stadtvogtei following a detrimental remark about the German Emperor.
 
 
William Marfell
 
William Marfell was a stoker on the 'Duns Law', originally from 237 Penarth Road, Cardiff, and was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 9. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

Charley Margerison
 
Charley Margerison is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Margerison is recorded as having been born on April 1st 1880 in Salford, and is described as having been a cashier prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 34 Rue de Cornet, Bruxelles. At the time the register was recorded, Margersion was noted as staying in box 16, having transferred there from Barrack 1 on April 19th 1915.
 
 

Reginald Frederick Maroney
 
Reginald Frederick Maroney is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Maroney is recorded as having been born on December 12th 1893 in London, and is described as having been a student prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 93 Norfolk Road, Dalston, London, N.E. At the time the register was recorded, Moore was noted as staying in box 2, where he had transferred from Barrack 2 on December 10th 1917.
 
 

Marray
 
Marray was one of sixteen men released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Times of January 29th 1917 ("Changed Conditions in Germany", p.8, col. G).
 
 
Sam Marsden
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Sam Marsden was from 76 Crosland Street, Crosland Moor, Huddersfield, and born in Batley in 1873. He is noted as having been a cloth miller, and arrested in Berlin, after which he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 
A. E. Marshall
 
A. E. Marshall is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Marshall was a merchant seaman on board the S. S. Hull, and interned in Barrack 8.
 
 
Charles Marshall
 
Charles Marshall was the fourth hand on the 'Rhine', originally from 26 Pelham Street, Grimsby, and was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 4. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 
Joseph Henry Marshall
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Joseph Henry Marshall was noted as being from 142 Patrick Street, Grimsby, and as having been born in Barton on Humber in 1893. He worked as a ship's steward and was arrested in Hamburg on 4 AUG 1914. He was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 8.
 
 

Tom H. Marshall
 
Tom H. Marshall is noted in the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine as having contributed to a series of "Negro Melodies" in the camp on February 13th 1916.
 
On April 27th 1916, Marshall gave a lecture in the camp on England and Elizabeth, as part of a Shakespeare week at the camp, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper of May 15th 1916 ("Shakespeare Celebrations in Ruhleben", p.7).
 
Marshall's contributions to the camp's musical life is recorded in the Musical Notes section of the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917):

"Much good work has been accomplished in the Chamber Music evenings. Two unfamiliar works have been brought to a hearing - the noble and gracious Sonata in E flat. of Brahms, for Viola and Pianoforte,a choice example of the composer's ripest period of creative activity, played with fine feeling by Messrs. J. Peebles Conn and W. Pauer; and Dvorak's Terzetto for two violins and viola, an engaging little work, played with excellent ensemble and understanding by Messrs. Peebles Conn, T. H. Marshall and Leslie Harris."

"...Mr. Arthur Dodd, Mr. Marshall, Mr. Williams, Mr. Philips, Mr. Schlesinger and others, who, in solo and ensemble work, have given of their best."
The Liddle Collection at Leeds University holds a great deal of material relating to Tom Marshall's time in Ruhleben, held under reference RUH 33, and donated by him in January 1977. These are four volumes of letters, from November 21st 1914 to May 10th 1917, transcribed by his sister and his father; papers relating to examinations taken at Ruhleben and endorsed by The Chartered Institute of Secretaries, the Royal Society of Arts and the University of London (June to December 1918); an extract from the Journal of the Royal Society of Arts, from November 15th 1918; a Soldiers Council open letter from 1918; a prospectus of work for the 1916 summer term at Ruhleben Camp School; a prospectus of work for the 1917 autumn term at Ruhleben Camp School; a Ruhleben Exhibition catalogue from 1919; and a typed transcript of an interview recorded with Peter Liddle in February 1999, the original audio recording held on tape 429. The online index tells us that Marshall was born in 1893 in London and was educated at Rugby and Trinity College, Cambridge. He was studying German in Weimar at the outbreak of the war and was duly interned at Ruhleben. He later became a professor.
 
 

Henry Thomas Martin
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/66 regarding the death of Henry Thomas Martin, an interned civilian at Ruhleben, and once gardener to HRH Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia. The documents contain a request from his wife, Mrs. Emily Martin, for confirmation of her husband's death in Berlin hospital, the transmission of his death certificate and private papers, and arrangements regarding Mrs. Martin's intention to leave Germany.
 
 

J. Martin
 
J. Martin, of Dublin, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 
Richard Martin
 
Richard Martin was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. He was described as a 25 year old artist who had been working in Spandau.
 
Richard Martin was also in another document in FO 369/710 dated 11 OCT 1914. The list was communicated to the Foreign Office by a Nurse Coe. Beside the typed name is written 2 Great James Street, St. James, Bristol (with thanks to Simon Fowler).
 
 

Ernest Marx
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/47 regarding British subject Ernest Marx, the owner of Messrs A. Marx and Co., jewellers of Regent Street, London. The documents hold details on payment of taxes to Germany, a claim against the company in respect of rent due on their property in Germany, and the detention of Ernest Marx at Ruhleben. There is also an enquiry from his wife, Mrs. M. Marx of Maida Vale, regarding the German authorities' insistence that on his release from Ruhleben he should be forced to reopen his business in Hamburg, Germany, in order that they might take half the takings.
 
 

Mason
 
A reference to a gent called Mason is recorded in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magzine (August 1916, p.37) as being a medium paced bowler playing cricket for the Barrack 2 side.
 
 
George Mason
 
George Mason is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Mason was a merchant seaman on board the Edwin Hunter, and interned in Barrack 10, loft 2.
 
Marcus Bateman's merchant seamen POW website lists George as being from Doris House, Audley Road, Hull, and an AB on the Edwin Hunter.
 
 
George A. Mason
 
George A. Mason was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 66 Seestrasse, Stuttgart.
 
 

Reginald Mason
 
Reginald Mason was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. He was described as a 26 year old correspondent previously at work in Berlin. This is almost certainly the same Mason listed as being at Ruhleben in another list in FO 369/710 dated 11 OCT 1914, communicated to the Foreign Office by a Nurse Coe (with thanks to Simon Fowler). In this he was stated to be from Leeds.
 
 
Reginald Hugh Mason
 
Reginald Hugh Mason appears to be a different person to the above Reginald Mason, who was noted as a correspondent from Leeds, with this one noted as a tailor from Sheffield.
 
The following information was kindly supplied by Donna Whittington in February 2008:
From the 'Moss Valley' (Sheffield) website -
 
Fifty Years of Church Life by The Rev. W. Odom.
"Reginald H. Mason, communicant and member of our Mens Bible class, has been a civil prisoner of war at Ruhleben since August 1914".
 
Reginald Hugh Mason is also listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Mason is recorded as having been born on November 20th 1887 in Sheffield, and is described as having been a tailor prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 89 Artisan View, Sheffield. At the time the register was recorded, Mason was noted as staying in loft B, having transferred there from Barrack 15 on April 19th 1915. 
 
Mason is also recorded as having spent some time in the Bird Cage between January 28th 1918 and January 31st, and is further recorded as having spent some time in the Schoningsbaracke between February 1st 1918 and February 4th. Between March 18th 1918 and March 23rdm, he was back in the Bird Cage.
 
 

C. H. A. Masterman

C. H. A. Masterman was appointed in March 1915 by Powell, the camp captain, to be on the committee of the camp's Education Department, as recorded in the Scotsman on 29/3/1915 (p.8) and the Times on 29/3/1915 ("More and Better Food at Ruhleben" p.4 col A). The department's remit was to control and administer the schools, classes, lectures, library and newspapers.
 
Masterman is noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for the Varsities team against the Rest of Ruhleben, in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
Masterman was also noted by Francis Gribble, in his essay entitled "Leaves From a Ruhleben Notebook".
But I must return to the scholars. One of the places set apart for them was the third grand stand, and another was the synagogue in the Jews' barrack. In the former place I heard Mr. Masterman deliver a course of lectures on English history which I should, in the old days, have described as eminently "good for the schools".
Masterman is also noted in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.38) as the captain of a cricket team in one of the camp's more memorable matches.
No match has created the same amount of interest in Ruhleben as that between Masterman's XI v. "The Next" XVI. Spice was added to this contest of the best 27 cricketers in the Camp, by the arranging of a "Sweepstake", by McPherson of 9, in which practically every man in the Lager took a sporting chance in this original idea. Each ticket held a combination of three players and the ticket bearing the names of the three highest scorers was the winner of the prize. This fell to the fortunate holder of the Masterman 91, Steadman 60, (not out) and Mounsey 26. In this match Dutton, for "The Rest" bowled brilliantly and took 4 for 25.
 
 

Sir John Cecil Masterman
 
John Cecil Masterman was listed in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.45) as being one of the better players in the Ruhleben Tennis Association. He was earlier noted in issue 7 of In Ruhleben Camp of having given a series of Friday lectures (Sep 1915, p.2).

masterman.jpg

Masterman went on to have an international sports career, playing tennis for England in 1920 and hockey for England in 1925 and 1927, and toured with the MCC in canada in 1937. He then became a successful fiction author, penning "An Oxford Tragedy" (1933), "Fate Cannot Harm Me" (1935) and "Marshal Ney" (1937). By 1940 he had joined MI5 on counter espionage work, his successful work here including convincing the Germans that the British would land at the Pas de calais on D-Day rather than the Normany beaches. He was awarded an OBE in 1945. he then took up a successful academic career at Oxford College.
 
Masterman's obituary appeared in The Times on June 7th 1977 ("Obituary: Sir John Masterman", p. 12, col. F).
 
The following short biographical entry was sent to me by Dr. Heinner Gillmeister in August 2005:
Masterman, Sir John Cecil (1891-1977).
Disappointing his father, a captain in the Royal Navy, by declining to adopt the naval career for which he had been trained at Osborne and Dartmouth, Masterman won a scholarship to Worcester College in 1909 and obtained a First in Modern History in 1913. After the First World War, during which he was interned in Germany, he was elected a Student of Christ Church and, with Keith Feiling, did much to make the History School of that college the best in the University. Extremely versatile, he was a novelist, playwright and sportsman - playing lawn tennis and hockey for England and cricket for the MCC - as well as a hard-working tutor. After doing invaluable work as an intelligence officer during the Second World War, he became Provost of Worcester College in 1946 and was Vice-Chancellor from 1957-8. In this office he was largely instrumental in raising £1,750,000 for the Oxford Historic Buildings Fund. After his retirement as Provost in 1961, he continued to devote his time, talents and formidable personality to the various public duties to which his energies and ramified contacts in the political and social world continued to draw him. His book on Oxford, To Teach the Senators Wisdom, was published in 1952."
 
 

Alexander William Matthews
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/71 concerning Alexander William Matthews, who was a British subject interned at Ruhleben. The file contains a request for documents, including his birth certificate, and regulations as to trading with the enemy.
 
 

Bernhard Percy Matheissen
 
Bernhard Percy Matheissen listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Matheissen is recorded as having been born on June 11th 1898 in London, and is described as having been a tailor prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 94 Rue Longue de la Station, Uccle, Nr Brussels. At the time the register was recorded, Matheissen was noted as staying in loft A, with his brother Ernest, both having arrived from Berlin on January 27th 1916. On January 16th 1918 he moved with his brother to Barrack 12.
 
 
Ernest Armand Matheissen
 
Ernest Armand Matheissen listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Matheissen is recorded as having been born on December 23rd 1894in London, and is described as having been a tailor prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 94 Rue Longue de la Station, Uccle, Nr Brussels. At the time the register was recorded, Matheissen was noted as staying in loft A, with his brother Bernhard, both having arrived from Berlin on January 27th 1916.
 
Between August 14th and October 8th 1917 Matheissen was resident in Lazarett. On January 16th 1918 he transferred with his brother to Barrack 12.
 
 

Harold Mather
 
Harold Mather was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 49 Bottinger Street, Ashton-under-Lyne.
 
 
John Mather
 
John Mather is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Mather is recorded as having been born on January 4th 1878 in North Shields, and is described as having been a seaman on the "Sam Wilfrids" prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 30 Chiston West View, North Shields. At the time the register was recorded, Mather was noted as staying in loft B, having transferred there from Barrack 4 on February 26th 1917.
 
 

Mathieson
 
Mathieson was noted in the Scotsman newspaper of May 12th 1915 as having played the bagpipes at the camp's first Burns Night supper ("A Burns Celebration in a German Prison", p.14).
 
 

Maurice brothers
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Percy and Walter Maurice were 18 Charing Cross Road, London prior to the war. pecy was born in London on 11 MAR 1889, whilst Maurice was born 19 MAR 1888. Both were music hall artists, with Walter arrested in Frankfurt and Percy arrested in Bremen on 6 NOV 1914. Both were then sent to Ruhleben, where they were interned in Barrack 1.
 
It is believed that the two men were brothers and that their surname was in fact a stage name, with their real surname being Hodgson.
 
One of the two Maurice men was noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the winning B side in a second division match between the A team and the B team, on October 3rd 1916. The score was B: 4 to A: 1.
 
 

Fritz Mautner
 
The National Archives in London holds records from 1915 at FO383/79 concerning an enquiry from Ruhleben prisoner Fritz Mautner, son of James Mautner, a naturalised British subject, regarding the welfare of his brother Hans (or Max), residing in Belfast. Most likely related to Max below...
 
 

Mase Mautner
 
Mase Mautner was the recipient of two postcards written in German, as illustrated in Frank Bachenheimer's "A Postal History Study of... The Ruhleben P.O.W. Camp 1914-1918" (Figs. 8 & 9). The first was sent from Berlin on 19 NOV 1914, and shows he was based in Barrack 2, Room 5.The second card, from Belfast, was posted December 19th, 2.30pm, but the year is not known. On the front of this card, Mautner was described as an "English Prisoner of War in the camp". (With thanks to Dr. Manfred G. Heber for clarifying the date of the first).
 
 

John Maver
 
John Maver is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Maver is recorded as having been born on March 24th 1881 in Aberdeen, and is described as having been a fisherman on the "Manx Queen" prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 5 Oxford Terrace, Grimsby. At the time the register was recorded, Maver was noted as staying in loft A.
 
Maver is also recorded as having spent some time in the Schonungsbaracke on October 28th 1918.
 
 

Alfred Maw
 
Maw was noted as playing on the England side, led by Steve Bloomer, in a mock international between England and the Rest of the World on May 2nd 1915. Kick off took place at 4.30pm, and a document with the teams listed discovered amongst some Foreign Office files by the National Archives in November 2005.
 
Maw was also noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.15) as having taken 3 for 8 in a cricket match between Barracks 5 and 6, in the second division of the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Maw is noted as being from 26 Charing Cross Road, London, and as having been born in 1887. He worked as a manager in Cologne, where he was arrested on 6 SEP 1914. After a brief period held in Cologne he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 

Maxwell
 
Maxwell was listed in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.45) as being a member of the Ruhleben Tennis Association.
 
 

May
 
May was noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the winning B side in a second division match between the A team and the B team, on October 3rd 1916. The score was B: 4 to A: 1.
 
 
Evan McBean
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Evan McBean is noted as being from 29 Royal Park Terrace, Edinburgh. He was a marine engineer, captured by the S. M. S. Augsburg on 7 SEP 1914, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 
James McCarthy (1885-1954)
 
Many thanks to Thomas Padron-McCarthy for the following sent to me in June 2009:
My grandfather, James McCarthy (1885-1954), was in this camp, and I
recently found a sketchbook with drawings made by him, from the camp. I've scanned it and put the images here:
http://www.lysator.liu.se/~padrone/ruhleben/index.html

Most of the drawings are from Ruhleben, and I believe they were made there, and not afterwards from memory.
 
 
G. F. J. McClarnon
 
McClarnon was noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the losing A side in a second division match between the A team and the B team on October 3rd 1916. The score was B: 4 to A: 1.
 
McClarnon was also in the Barrack 20 football team at Ruhleben, and according to issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917) played in the cup final in April 1917. The first leg was a scoreless draw, and in the rematch three days later, Barrack 20 won, 3-0.
 
In April 2008 I was contacted by Chris Littlewood, the husband of McClarnon's granddaughter, who kindly supplied the unusual information that McLarnon had in fact been a soldier in the Royal Scots Fusiliers. In their possession is a cigarette case with the inscriptions "Ruhleben FA Cup" 1916-1917", "Winners", "Bar 20" and "Presented by Supporters", along with his name. On the medal index cards at www.ancestry.co.uk, McClarnon's presence in the Royal Scots Fusliers is confirmed - his regimental service number having been 9929 and his rank listed as private. He was entitled to receive the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. Many thanks to Chris for his contribution.
 
 
C. McCleary
 
C. McCleary was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 1 Fazakerley Road, Walton, Liverpool.
 
 

Cyril McCormack
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1916 at FO383/206 regarding an enquiry from Mrs McCormack about her son, Cyril McCormack, a prisoner in Ruhleben, including a request for him to be considered in a future exchange of prisoners.
 
 

Bernard McCourt
 
Bernard McCourt is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, McCourt is recorded as having been born on July 26th 1890 in London, and is described as having been a teacher prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 72 Upper Tooting Road, London, S.W. At the time the register was recorded, McCourt was noted as staying in box 5.
 
Between December 28th and January 26th, McCourt spent some time in the camp's Schonungsbaracke.
 
 

McDermott
 
McDermott is noted in the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.36) as having given readings at a lecture by Pender entitled "The New Poetry".
 
 

McDonald
 
McDonald was noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the winning B side in a second division match between the A team and the B team, on October 3rd 1916. The score was B: 4 to A: 1.
 
 

McDornan
 
McDornan was listed in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.45) as being a member of the Ruhleben Tennis Association.
 
 

H. McGill
 
McGill is noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for the Varsities team against the Rest of Ruhleben, in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
H. McGill was also named in an article in the Manchester Guardian of Auguist 19th 1915 (p.6) as having participated in a Lincolnshire versus Yorkshire cricket match at Ruhleben.
 
 
 
T. McGrath
 
T. McGrath was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 20 Sandhurst Street, Aigb'th, Liverpool.
 
 

J. McGurrain
 
J. McGurrain was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

William McKenzie
 
William McKenzie was appointed in March 1915 by Powell, camp captain, to the committee of the Health Department at Ruhleben, as reported by the Scotsman on 29/3/1915 and the Times on 29/3/1915 ("More and Better Food at Ruhleben" p.4 col A). The Health Department's remit was to see to the general health of the camp, such as the care of the sick, the prevention of illness, and the distribution of relief in kind.
 
 

William Norman Leslie McKimm
 
William Norman Leslie McKimm is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, McKimm is recorded as having been born on May 14th 1895 in Armagh, Ireland, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 4 Myton Road, W. Dulwich, London. At the time the register was recorded, McKimm was noted as staying in loft A.
 
McKinnon is also recorded as having spent some time in the Schonungsbaracke between July 6th 1918 and July 9th.
 
 

A. McLean
 
A. McLean was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 49 Chestnut Grove, Bootle.
 
 

C. E. McMillan
 
On April 23rd, 24th and 25th, 1916, C. E. McMillan appeared in the camp's production of Shakespeare's "As You Like It", playing the role of Maria, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper of May 15th 1916 ("Shakespeare Celebrations in Ruhleben", p.7).
 
 
W. C. McNally
 
In a list of prisoners from the Wolf transferred to Ruhleben in A. H. F. Clarke's "To Kiel on the German Raider Wolf and Beyond", W. C. McNally is noted as a Ruhleben prisoner from Ceylon, captured on the ship Matunga in early 1918. See entry for Alfred Henry Frank Clarke.
 
 

Captain Walter James McNamee
 
Captain Walter James McNamee was imprisoned at Ruhleben Camp from 1916 to the end of hostilities.

Prior to his internment, he had been kept prisoner on his ship, the Sinainn, which belonged to the Limerick Line out of Liverpool, in Hamburg, where he was unfortunate enough to be unloading cargo when war broke out. He remained on board the ship with some of the crew for nearly two years until the Battle of Jutland, after which he was transferred to Ruhleben.
 
Amongst the mementoes of Captain Mack's stay (as he was affectionately known) are two complete bound volumes of the camp magazine for 1915 & 1916, with the 1916 violume believed to be bound in rat skin leather. The volume was sent home to his wife, with the flyleaf inscribed as follows:
From: W. J. McNamee, Barrack 8, Box 23, Ruhleben to Mrs McNamee 21 Dundonald Road, Aigburth, Liverpool, England.
During his stay at Ruhleben, Walter's wife sent parcels out to Germany regularly which family tradition has it included loaves of bread into which she allegedly baked copies of the Liverpool Echo to keep her husband up to date with the 'real' news!
 
Upon his return to Britain after the war, Walter would talk very little about his time in the camp, though did recount one story aboutthe worst thing he remembered, being the distress caused to men whose names appeared on the repatriation list, moved slowly up towards the top, only to disappear when they believed they would be the next to go home. After watching this happen to several of his friends, he decided to never looked at the list himself.
 
When he did return home, Walter brought a small attache case with him (held by his grandson) full of worthless German Mark banknotes, and two camp issue blankets, one of which which his daughter ended up using as blackout curtains during the second world war, and the other of which she converted into a 'camp fire blanket' for her son when he was in the scouts.
 
After his release he returned to seafaring and eventually became Commodore of the Limerick Line. This, in turn, was subsumed into the Elder-Dempster Line, one of the bigger Liverpool based shipping companies. He retired from the sea in the early 1930s and died in 1939.
 
Many thanks to Walter's grandson Andrew Spencer for sharing the above in June 2007.
 
 

Robert McNeil
 
Robert McNeil was a former Edinburgh University man who was interned in Ruhleben at the outbreak of war. The Scotsman newspaper on 1/1/1915 (p.8) recorded the text of the following postcard sent to Edinburgh University:
"Best greetings to the old 'Varsity from the following students and ex-students at present resident at Ruhleben - James L. Mounsey; H. J. W. Tillyard, lecturer in Greek; W. J. Crosland Briggs, M.A., 1914; Harold Luck, M.A., 1913; M. F. Liddle, M.A., 1909; J. Halliday, M.A., 1914; James Peebles Conn, Bucher scholar in music, 1902; J. M. Dickson, M.A., BSc., Agric.; R. Herdman Pender, M.A., teacher in George Heriot's School; E. G. Burgoyne, J. Fleming, 1895-97; Robert McNeil, 1905-6; Eric G. Riddell, 1908-9, former students."
 
 

McPherson
 
McPherson is noted in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.38) as being a member of Barrack 9, and having created a lot of excitement in the camp over a particular cricket match by way of an original idea of his:
No match has created the same amount of interest in Ruhleben as that between Masterman's XI v. "The Next" XVI. Spice was added to this contest of the best 27 cricketers in the Camp, by the arranging of a "Sweepstake", by McPherson of 9, in which practically every man in the Lager took a sporting chance in this original idea. Each ticket held a combination of three players and the ticket bearing the names of the three highest scorers was the winner of the prize. This fell to the fortunate holder of the Masterman 91, Steadman 60, (not out) and Mounsey 26. In this match Dutton, for "The Rest" bowled brillaintly and took 4 for 25.
 
 

Archibald McPherson

Archibald McPherson was on board ship in Hamburg docks on 4th August 1914 when he was arrested and interned in Ruhleben for the duration of the war. He returned to his native Liverpool on release, and died in 1938, aged 52, having had one son, born 1920.

Archibald's grandson, David MacPherson, has several of his grandfather's momentoes from Ruhleben. These include two books (‘In Ruhleben Camp’ and ‘The Ruhleben Camp Magazine 1915’) and three post cards. One card is from the Liverpool Prisoners of War Help Committee addressed to him in Barrack 21 and posted on 15 Dec 1915, one (a full size postcard photo of him) from him to my grandmother sent 1915/1916, by which time he had relocated to Barrack 8. There is also a card, (presumably given to him by his captors on his release and printed in both German and English) addressed to ‘Englishmen, brothers from over the channel’, and a letter to him from the King.

From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that McPherson was from 44 Beaconsfield Road, Seaforth, and that he was born in Seacombe on 22 MAR 1884. He was a carpenter and was arrested in Hamburg on 4 AUG 1914 and after a brief imprisonment in Hamburg was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
Marcus Bateman's merchant POW site lists him as from 14 Beaconsfield Road, not 44, and from the boat Borderland.
 
 

T. McPherson
 
T. McPherson was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 41 Beaconsfield Road, Seaforth.
 
 
Frederick Meadowcroft
 
Fred Meadowcroft is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Meadowcroft is recorded as having been born on November 1st 1894 in Luddendedfoot, Yorkshire, and is described as having been a clerk prior to his internment. His home address was listed as Rockcliffe, Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire. At the time the register was recorded, Meadowcroft was noted as staying in Box 24.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Meadowcroft is noted as being from Rockcliffe, Sowerby Bridge, and as having been born in Luddendenfoot in 1894. He worked as a cotton doubler in Zittau, where he was arrested on 6 NOV 1914. After a brief period held in Zittau, Dresden and Berlin, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 
Frank Meadows
 
Frank Meadows was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 15 Claughton Road, Birkenhead.
 
 
George Meadows
 
George Meadows was the quarter master on the 'Sappho', originally from Epney, Stonehouse, and was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 4. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 
H. Megginson
 
H. Megginson is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Megginson was a merchant seaman on board the Coralie Horlock, and interned in Barrack 11.
 
 

Albert Berthold Gustav Mekelburg
 
Albert Berthold Gustav Mekeburg is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Mekelburg is recorded as having been born on July 21st 1870 in Rugenwalde, Germany, and is described as having been a friseur prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 9 Mill Street Gardens, Capetown, South Africa. At the time the register was recorded, Mekelburg was noted as staying in box 26, having transferred there from Barrack 18 on May 16th 1917. He later returned to England on January 2nd 1918.
 
 

H. Meldale
 
H. Meldale was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

Meldon
 
Meldon was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Scotsman newspaper on January 31st 1917 ("British Civilians From Ruhleben", p.6).
 
 

J. T. Mellington
 
J. T. Mellington, of Sunderland, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

C. H. Mellor
 
C. H. Mellor was one of sixteen men released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Times of January 29th 1917 ("Changed Conditions in Germany", p.8, col. G).
 
 
H. Mellor
 
H. Mellor is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Mellor was a merchant seaman on board the S. S. Hull, and interned in Barrack 3, stall 24.
 
 
J. H. Mellor
 
J. H. Mellor is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Mellor was a merchant seaman on board the S. S. Hull, and interned in Barrack 3, box 19.
 
 

Henry Cortlandt Melville
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding Henry Cortlandt Melville, specifically, the transmission of his baptismal certificate with a view to his release when aged 55 years.
 
 

John Melville
 
John Melville is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Melville is recorded as having been born on July 2nd 1889 in Dundee, and is described as having been a hotel employee prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 26 Calder Street, Glasgow. At the time the register was recorded, Melville was noted as staying in loft A, having transferred there from Barrack 7 on October 28th 1916. He later relocated to Holland on March 22nd 1918.
 
 

Robert Melville
 
Robert Melville is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Melville is recorded as having been born on June 19th 1867 in Rum-Denn-An, Scotland, and is described as having been a merchant prior to his internment. His home address was listed as the Royal Colonial Institute, London. At the time the register was recorded, Melville was noted as staying in box 25, having transferred there from the Tea House on April 19th 1915.
 
Melville was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded in this as 4 Uplands Road, Stroud Green, London, N.
 
Melville was appointed in March 1915 by Powell, the camp's captain, to the committee of the Health Department at Ruhleben, as reported by the Scotsman on 29/3/1915 and the Times on 29/3/1915 ("More and Better Food at Ruhleben" p.4 col A).
 
Melville moved into the Schonungsbaracke on September 18th 1917, and then to the Lazarett on September 20th 1917. Four days later he was transferred to the Sanatorium on Setember 24th 1917, where he sadly died two days later, on September 29th 1917.
 
October 23rd 1916, the Scotsman newspaper reported the death of Melville's son:
Lt. Sydney J. C. Melville, R. F. A.
 
Sec. Lt. Sydney J. C. Melville, Royal Field Artillery (killed), was 25 years of age, and the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Robert Melville, Hamburg. His father has been interned at the civil prisoners camp at Ruhleben since the beginning of hostilities. Lt. Melville was a nephew of Mr and Mrs P. Hutchison, Jordanhill, who have received intimation of his death.
October 27th 1917, the Scotsman later reported Melville's own death at Ruhleben ("Fifeshire Man's Death in Germany", p.6). The brief article notes that Melville was the son of T. R. Melville, of Melville House, Kingskettle, Fife and that he had been in business in Hamburg for several years prior to the outbreak of the war. He died in September 1917 at Ruhleben, and was survived by a brother, T. R. Melville, a writer based in Glasgow, Scotland.
 
 

C. Mendelson
 
The National Archives in London hold records from 1915 at FO383/77 concerning a claim for damage to personal belongings of C. Mendelson, a British subject interned at Ruhleben.
 
 

Albert Theobald Menten
 
Albert Theobald Menten is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Menten is recorded as having been born on January 24th 1897 in London, and is described as having been a pastry cook prior to his internment. His home address was listed as Senheim a/d Mosel. At the time the register was recorded, Menten was noted as staying in box 5.
 
 

George Merritt
 
George Merritt is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Merritt is recorded as having been born on December 10th 1890, and is not listed as having any form of occupation prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 18 Mayola Road, Clapton, London, N.E. At the time the register was recorded, Menten was noted as staying in loft B.
 
Merritt was noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.20) as being somewhat less than impressed with the committee of the Ruhleben Dramatic Society:
"Mr. Merritt (with gusto) was going to act in what he liked and he would see the Society damned first."
Merritt is then noted in the first issue of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.8) as having appeared in the play "Major Barbara" in the camp. He also performed several scenes from the play at Kapp's lecture on "Drama as a Work of Art" (p.36).
 
In the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.8), Merritt is listed as having performed in the Irish Players' rendition of the play "John Bull's Other Island".
 
In the fourth issue of the magazine (August 1916, p.33), Merritt's role as Iago in Skaespeare's "Othello" was analysed:
Mr. Merritt's Iago was too toned-down; Iago is the fundamental pivot about whom this play moves and has its being. This disharmony was perhaps unavoidable, and did not exhaust the production of its very large interest...
In issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917) Merritt is listed as having produced the play "The Tenth Man" in the camp.
 
Merritt is also recorded as having spent some time in the Schonungsbaracke between July 5th 1918 and July 12th, and again between July 14th 1918 and July 25th.
 
Merritt's obituary in The Times on September 22nd 1977 recalls he had been arrested in Germany, having gone there to study German theatre. After the war he took up a successful career acting, initially in theatre, and latterly also on television. He died on August 27th 1977 at the age of 86 ("Obituary: Mr. George Merritt", p. 12, col. F).
 
The Liddle Collection at Leeds University holds various items relating to Merritt's stay at Ruhleben, under reference RUH 34, all of which were donated by him in September 1976 and July 1977. These include 17 Ruhleben Theatre programmes from between 1915 and 1916; 26 photographs and postcards from 1916 to 1918; a typescript and manuscript of his recollections; a typed transcript of an interview recorded with Peter Liddle in July 1977, and audio recording held at tape 452; and two obituaries from 'The Daily Telegraph' (August 1977) and 'The Times' (September 2nd 1977). The online index tells us that Merritt was born in 1890 at Hackney, London, and that he was in Magdeburg studying German theatre and teaching at the Berlitz School at the outbreak of the war. During his time in Riuhleben he resided in Barrack 5, and was involved in over 50 plays, later becoming a well-known actor.
 
 

Jeffrey Sutton Messent
 
The Liddle Collection holds several items relating to inmate Jeffery Sutton Messent, under reference number RUH 35, mainly placed in the collection by Mrs J. M. Messent, after her husband's death. These are: three photographs; two manuscript pencil plans of accomodation at Ruhleben; four pencil drawings of Ruhleben views from July 31st 1915, and August 21st 1915; three pen and ink drawings by R. Walker; a typescript copy of recollections entitled 'The German Revolution of November 1918' (written November 1936); and a pearwood screwdriver (donated by W. E. Swale). The online index tells us that Messent resided in Barrack 10 during his stay at the camp.
 
 

Metvger
 
Metvger was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Scotsman newspaper on January 31st 1917 ("British Civilians From Ruhleben", p.6).
 
 
C. Meyer
 
C. Meyer's signature was recorded by fellow internee Christopher Cornforth on May 20th 1915, in an autograph book now held at the Imperial War Museum. He was from Kimberley in South Africa, and was interned in Barrack XI.
 
Many thanks to Christopher's granddaughter Christine Pierce who provided this information in December 2007.
 
 

J. Meyer
 
J. Meyer was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

John J. Middleton
 
John J. Middleton, of Hull, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Middleton was previously contactable via a Mrs Shaw of Newport near Hull, and that he was born in 1877. He was a mariner, and was arrested in Hamburg and imprisoned on the hulks, before being sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 2.
 
 

George Middlewood
 
George Middlewood was one of six prisoners released from Ruhleben in October 1917, who made their way to Rotterdam to proceed to England, as reported in The Times of October 5th 1917 ("Imperial and Foreign News", p.7, col. F).
 
 

W. Miles
 
W. Miles, of Gateshead, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

Alexander Douglas Milimine
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1916 at FO383/207 regarding a request by Mr. F. W. Milmine for efforts to be made to secure the release and repatriation to the USA of his brother, Alexander Douglas Milimine, who was interned at Ruhleben Camp.
 
 

Theodore Ernst Millard
 
Theodore Ernst Millard is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Millard is recorded as having been born on January 18th 1891 in Wesel, Germany, and is described as having been an architect prior to his internment. His home address was listed as Roonstr. 12, Vohwinkel. At the time the register was recorded, Millard was noted as staying in box 26, having transferred there from the Tea House on April 22nd 1916. On July 31st 1918 Millard was given indefinite leave from the camp.
 
 

Fred Miller
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Fred Miller was noted as being from 31 George Street, Cardiff, and as having been born in Dundee in 1887. He worked as a seaman and was arrested in Bremen on 4 AUG 1914. He was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 7.
 
This is likely the unnamed Miller who was noted as having been interned in Barrack 8 and as having played for the barrack football team against Barrack 20 in the RFA cup final in April 1917, as noted in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917). The first match was a draw, 1-1. In the replay, three days later, Barrack 8 lost, 3-0.
 
Another Miller was also further noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the winning Cameron's XI side against Brearley's XI on October 7th 1916. The score was 4-2 to the Cameron team.
 
 

Hugh Miller
 
Hugh Miller was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. He was described as a 23 year old student previously at work in Berlin.
 
This is likely to be the same Miller listed in another document in FO 369/710 dated 11 OCT 1914. The name was included in a list communicated to the Foreign Office by a Nurse Coe (with thanks to Simon Fowler).
 
According to Elizabeth Beasley, daughter of Ruhleben inmate Jack Griggs, Hugh Miller contributed lyrics to "Don't Laugh", which premiered in the camp on 8 May 1915.
 
Miller was also the author of a short story entitled "One of Us" in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.36).
 
Miller is then noted in the first issue of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.10) as having appeared in a series of one act performances entitled "Geordie" and "Breaker's ahead" on February 9th 1916.
 
Miller was thanked for articles written for the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
 
Louis Miller
 
Louis Miller was recorded by fellow internee Christopher Cornforth on March 5th 1916, in an autograph book now held at the Imperial War Museum. He was interned in Barrack 11.
 
Many thanks to Christopher's granddaughter Christine Pierce who provided this information in December 2007. Christine also noted that this may have been the gent called Miller who was a diamond merchant from Holland, but is uncertain.
 
 

D. Millington
 
In the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.6), we learn that D. Millington, of Barrack 11, returned to England on March 19th 1916.
 
 

A. Mills
 
Mills was noted as playing in goal for the winning Tottenham Hotspur side at a competition held in Ruhleben in November 1914, in an article for the Scotsman newspaper dated April 21st 1915, and entitled "Football Among War Prisoners in Germany". The story is also covered in The Times of April 20th 1915 (p.5, col. B), where it is further noted that he played formerly for Preussen.
 
Mills was also noted as playing on the Rest of the World side, led by Cameron, in a mock international between England and the Rest of the World on May 2nd 1915. Kick off took place at 4.30pm, and a document with the teams listed was recently discovered amongst some Foreign Office files by the National Archives, in November 2005.  
 
Mills was later noted as being in the Barrack 20 football team at Ruhleben, and was noted in the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p. 29) as having been a member of a football team led by John Cameron, which defeated an opposing side led by Steve Bloomer on March 3rd 1916.
 
Mills was also noted in the football section of the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as now being a member of Barrack 11.
 
According to issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), Mills also played in the cup final in April 1917. The first leg was a scoreless draw, and in the rematch three days later, Barrack 20 won, 3-0.
 
 

Charles Mills  (28/11/1888 – 8/6/1972)

 

Charles Mills was born in Hamburg, Germany, on November 28th, 1888 in an apartment above the weighing‑room of the Bahrenfeld racetrack where his Irish horse dealer father, Anthony Mills, resided as trainer. He was the third of six brothers, all becoming successful trainers and drivers, with Charlie riding to his first trotter victory in a Monte race in 1900, and driving his first horse on October 11th, 1903 in Berlin. At the age of 16, he received his driver's licence, having worked until then as an amateur, and went on to great success in Germany, France, Denmark, Sweden, and Austria.

 

At the outbreak of war in 1914, Charlie, an Irish subject, was interned at Ruhleben as an enemy alien, but whilst here continued to train horses, despite the severe restrictions on his freedom.

 

At the end of the war, he moved to Vienna, where he revolutionised European trotting by adopting American training methods. His first success was at the Austrian Derby in 1919 with his horse Baka, and by the time Charlie moved back to Germany in 1924, he had won 624 races in Austria and Hungary.

 

By his 50th birthday in 1938, he had registered 2988 victories (2355 in Germany, 624 in Austria‑Hungary, 6 in Denmark and one each in France, Sweden and Italy). He then won the German Derby 7 times, the Austrian Derby 3 times, the Matadoren‑Rennen 8 times and the International Championship in Copenhagen thrice. After the war ended, he never knew how many winners he had guided across the finishing line, as all evidence of his career in Berlin was destroyed by R.A.F. bombings of the city.

 

In 1947, Charlie fled Berlin as a refugee from Russian occupation, leaving behind a castle, farms, a high‑powered American Auburn roadster and works of art. He settled in Paris at the Hotel Crillon, moving in with a collection of 26 paintings by Dutch masters, and from here rebuilt his training career, soon becoming the most revered figure in French trotting, becoming the prime promoter in lifting the French "trotteur" to world rank, and becoming known affectionately as the "Sorcerer of Chamant" for his troubles.

 

Charles Mills died aged 83 on June 8th 1972 at his home in Chamant near Paris from intestinal carcinoma after a supposedly successful operation two months previous.

 

 

John Mills
 
From a photo of a National Archives file from collection MT9, supplied by Marcus Bateman in March 2007, it is known that on December 4th 1916, John Mills, of Barrack 11, was granted leave to visit Rennetallbesitzer Friedemann, Hamburg-Farmsen, until March 5th 1917 (Camp Changes, Supplement 10). Many thanks to Marcus.

 

 

Thomas Mills

 

Thomas Mills is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Mills was a merchant seaman on board the Duke of Wellington, and interned in Barrack 17.

 

 

W. Mills
 
W. Mills was a British horse trainer working in Hoppegarten, who was interned in Ruhleben at the beginning of November 1914, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper on 9/11/1914 (p.9), and in The Times of the same day ("British Interned in Germany", p. 7, col. E).
 
In April 2008 Jochem Heicke in Germany graciously supplied me with the following additional infromation:
W. Mills, trainer button # 110, was released under condition as trainer. He stayed in Germany after the war.
 
 
 
Adam Milne
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Adam Milne was from Muirhead, Scpotland, and was born at Cuxhaven on 14 AUG 1884. He is noted as having been a seaman, and was arrested in Hamburg, after which he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 4.
 
 

Herbert James Milne
 
Herbert James Milne is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Milne is recorded as having been born on October 25th 1887 in Reading, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 46 Sandy Lane, Chorlton c/ Hardy. At the time the register was recorded, Milne was noted as staying in box 9.
 
 

John James Milne
 
John James Milne is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Milne is recorded as having been born on September 14th 1872 in Edinburgh, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 248 Leith Walk, Leith, Edinburgh. At the time the register was recorded, Milne was noted as staying in box 15, having transferred there from the Tea House on April 19th 1915. Milne later returned to England on March 7th 1918.
 
NB: John is recorded as John Adames Milne in files held at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. 
 
 

J. L. Milne
 
J. L. Milne was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

Milner
 
Milner was also present at the Exhibition on February 10th 1919, where he was one of the prisoners who entertained the King and Queen on a Royal visit to see for themselves what the civilians had endured, and as recorded in The Times of February 11th 1919 ("Ruhleben Exhibition", p.9, col. F). Milner, along with Filmore, presented the King with a rabbit skin bound volume of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine.
 
 

Frank Clifford Milner
 
The Liddle Collection of Leeds University holds a couple of items relating to Frank Clifford Milner, namely a sketch of him by C. M. Horsfall, and an obituary from the Macclesfield Courier dated December 24th 1943. The items, donated by Madge Milner in April 1977, are held under reference RUH 36. The online index tells us that Milner was educated at London University, and was working as a teacher at Thuringer, Germany, since 1912, where he was arrested and then moved to Ruhleben.
 
Frank Clifford ("Cliff") Milner was one of Jack Griggs' best friends at the Camp, according to Jack's daughter Elizabeth Beasley, in June 2006. They studied French together.  Cliff held classes in bookbinding and Elizabeth still has an example of his handiwork in the French novel he covered in ratskin and gave to Jack on his 21st birthday.
 
 
J. C. Milner
 
A J. C. Milner is noted on a postcard dated 30 AUG 1916 from Bern, now held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria, as being in Barrack 11 Box 14 (with thanks to Dr. Heber). 
 
 

Milogoni
 
Milogoni was a regular contributor of sketches to the In Ruhleben Camp magazine.
 
 

S. Milton-Hart
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/55 regarding an application for a monthly allowance until the end of the war for Mrs. S. Milton Hart, in Holland, the Dutch-born wife of Mr. S. Milton-Hart, a lecturer at Berlin University subsequently interned at Ruhleben.
 
 

Konstantin Mineeff

konstantinmineeff.jpg

Konstantin Mineeff was a Russian inmate at Ruhleben, as confirmed by his grandson Christian Mineeff in February 2006. In Christian's possession is an original document, dated November 1st 1918, issued by the 'Englanderlager Ruhleben' Kommandant, giving a testimonial about his grandfather, saying that he was interned in the camp from December 1914 until October 1918. Christian was surprised to discover the document, as a result of a trawl through surviving possessions after a fire at his father's house, as family folklore always had it that Mineeff had fled from White Russia to London in 1917, as a result of the Bolshevik revolution.
 
After the war, Mineeff moved to London, where he eventually died in 1928 of a heart attack. His son, and Christian's father, Alexander Konstantine, was born in 1920 in London, and served all his life in the armed forces, Colonial police, and then the Diplomatic Service, and is now resident in a retirement home in Sandbach, Cheshire.

Henry M. Mist
 
H. M. Mist was thanked for his illustrations for the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
The Times of February 5th 1919 tells us that the Crown Princess of Sweden returned on February 4th to the Ruhleben Exhibition, and purchased 40 paintings, with the painters selected including Mist ("Court News", p.11, col. B).
 
Mist was released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 9. (Many thanks to Marcus Bateman for this last detail.)
 
 
Fred Mitchell
 
Fred Mitchell was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 11. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

James P. Mitchell (1874 - )
 
James P. Mitchell was a merchant seaman on the Indianola, and was originally from the Glenariff area of the Glens of Antrim, Ireland. He was interned in Ruhleben and his name appeared in a list of merchant seamen interned there, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
The following was supplied by James' great grandson in July 2006, for which I am eternally grateful:
 
My great grandfather master mariner James P. Mitchell from Belfast was imprisoned in the camp for the duration of World War One. His ship was impounded by the Germans on the first day of the war and he and wife, my great grandmother, Rose were detained by the Germans. Unhappily, my great grandmother had a breakdown and was repatriated in the early months of the war. She later died from consumption in a mental asylum in Antrim in 1915, having been deranged ‘by prolonged mental cruelty’.  She thought she was still being held by the Germans … and that they had installed a wireless up the chimney. Her husband was released at the end of the war and went back to seafaring, dying in the early 1930s. I have only scant details of his incarceration but I do have a treasured memento which, according to family lore, he made while a prisoner. It is a bullet and a bullet casing which has been made into a plane with soldered wings and an undercarriage. The plane is a surprisingly detailed model of a German Taube reconnaissance plane.
 
Thanks to Joseph for the above.
 
Further details on Mitchell can be sourced at the Index of British Fisherman and Merchant Seamen taken Prisoner of War 1914-1918 located at http://wanborough.ukuhost.co.uk/POW/POW.htm.
 
James is possibly the Mr Mitchell noted on a copy of a slip supplied by Denis Camps in October 2007, recording an order for the Ruhleben Daily News at Barrack 2 Box 17, paid up to January 9th 1916.
 
 
Fritz Moeder
 
Fritz Moeder is noted as having been in the Teahouse on an envelope dated 11 FEB 1916, held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

William Edmund Moll
 
William Edmund Moll is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Moll is recorded as having been born on May 11th 1895 in London, and is described as having been a compositor prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 4 West Morland Street, London, S.W. At the time the register was recorded, Moll was noted as staying in loft B, where he had transferred from Barrack 14 on April 19th 1915.
 
 
Moller
 
Moller is noted as having been in Barrack 19 on a letter to Dortmund dated 14 MAY 1916, a photocopy of which is held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

James Molloy
 
James Molloy was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. James was described as a 23 year old 'rentier' (I think French for 'annuitant') who had been working in Berlin.
 
Molloy is also noted in a document in FO 369/710 as a 23 year old English correspondent sent first to Berlin's Stadtvogtei on 24 AUG 1914 and then to Ruhleben on 9 SEP 1914. He had been residing at 51 Gleditchstrasse in Berlin. The information was originally compiled by the American Embassy in Berlin.
 
A J. Molloy was noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (1915, p.22) as being the captain of the Irish rugby team in a series of friendly internationals in the camp.
 
 

William Molloy
 
William Molloy, of Dublin, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
From Marcus Bateman's merchant seamen website, we learn that William was in fact the chief officer on the 'City of Hamburg', and prior to the war was based at 29 Windsor Avenue, Dublin. He was eventually released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. Throughout his stay he was interned in Barrack 11.
 
 

William O' Sullivan Moloney (also Molony)
 
William O' Sullivan Moloney was thanked for his illustrations for the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
From a photo of a National Archives file from collection MT9, supplied by Marcus Bateman in March 2007, it is known that on November 30th 1916, Moloney returned to Barrack 7 from the Sanitorium (Camp Changes, Supplement 10). Many thanks to Marcus.
 
In May 2008, I was contacted by Doug Johnson, who has kindly supplied some further biographical information on Molony, for which I am extremely grateful:

Correspondence with the United States Ambassador respecting the Treatment of British Prisoners of War and Interned Civilians in Germany Miscellaneous No 14 (1915) (Cd 7959) HMSO

 

William O’Sullivan Molony, the young son of Mrs. Uhse-Molony, who is only 17 years old, is also interned at Ruhleben.  Frau Uhse was first married to an Irishman by the name of Molony, and William O’Sullivan Molony is a son from this marriage.   Later she was married to the late Captain Karl uhse, of the 63rd Artillery Regiment at Frankfort.  Mrs Uhse is at present in Berlin, and would be willing to give every necessary security for the release of her son, or for the permission for her son to go to America on parole.

 
 

H. B. Molyneux
 
H. B. Molyneux was noted in a Scotsman newspaper article of April 12th 1916 as having contributed humorous pen and ink sketches to the "Prisoners' Pie" annual, printed in Ruhleben ("Prisoners Pie - A Souvenir of Ruhleben Camp", p.5).
 
Molyneux later had the honour to be lampooned by way of a monogram drawn in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), by artist CMAW.
 
Molyneux was also thanked for his illustrations for the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1916 at FO383/206, regarding an enquiry by Mr Molyneux concerning his son, H. Molyneux, interned at Ruhleben.
 
 

Herbert Monk
 
Herbert Monk was an inmate in Ruhleben who wrote to the Times concerning the state of bread sent from Britain when it reached the camp. The letter, printed on September 28th 1915 ("Bread for Ruhleben", p. 9, col.C) stated:
TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES
 
Sir, - You would be doing a good work by publishing the following in your esteemed paper and requesting provincial newspapers to copy. Nearly all the bread which is sent from England to prisoners in this camp arrives here in a more or less mouldy condition and a great deal therefore has to be thrown away, much to the bitter sorrow and annoyance of the recipients. The parcels are, as a rule, 16 to 20 days, often longer, on the way. The loaves should, before being baked, be brushed over with egg albumen, be bekaed hard and be quite dry before being packed. "Cylinder bread" generally arrives in good condition. By making the above known to the public I think a great deal of the waste of good bread could be avoided.
 
Thanking you in advance,
 
I am, Sir, yours truly,
HERBERT MONK.
Englanderlager, Ruhleben, Sept, 20.
The same letter appeared in the Manchester Guardian on October 15th 1915 (p. 3).
 
George Monks
 
George Monks was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 266 Lovely Lane, Warrington.
 
He may be the same George Monk noted in the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915 as being a student from 8 Kurfurstenstrasse in Chemnitz, who was arrested in the town on 6 NOV 1914 and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 

Captain Archibald Montgomery-Campbell
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/53 regarding the situation of Captain Archibald Montgomery-Campbell, a retired British military officer interned in Germany. The documents include representations that he be transferred to an officers' camp, and correspondence and remittances for a Mrs. J. D. Leather Culley, of Belford, Northumberland. Subsequent reports are included of his transfer to Ruhleben, and notice of a possible inclusion in an exchange of incapacitated officers.
 
 

Moon
 
Moon was noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the winning B side in a second division match between the A team and the B team, on October 3rd 1916. The score was B: 4 to A: 1.
 
 

Moore
 
Moore was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

Moore
 
Moore was reported in the Times of September 8th 1916 as having been a well-known footballer who had died in the camp from erysipelas, and it stated that during his illness "mosquitoes and flies nearly ate him alive" ("Returned Prisoners' Stories", p.5, col. D).
 
 
Charles Moore
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Charles Moore was resident at Hoppegarten Nr. Berlin, was born in Niederheide on 17 JUN 1895, was a jockey arrested in Hoppegarten on 6 NOV 1914, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 1.
 
 

Charles Herbert Moore
 
Charles Herbert Moore is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Moore is recorded as having been born on May 11th 1890 in Willesden, and is described as having been a merchant prior to his internment. His home address was listed as c/o S. B. Gibbs, 11 Hamstel Road, Southend. At the time the register was recorded, Moore was noted as staying in box 23. He later relocated to Holland on March 7th 1918.
 
 

Dr. Henry Sumner Moore
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/26 regarding Dr. Henry S. Moore and Dr. Rutherford, namely an enquiry as to whether they may be released as doctors as holding American degrees.
 
In the seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp, H. Sumner Moore is noted as one of the camp's dentists, the other being Dr. Percy Rutterford(Sep 1915, p.29).
 
Dr. Moore later had the honour to be lampooned by way of a monogram drawn in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), by artist CMAW.
 
A Dr. S. Moore was appointed in March 1915 by Powell, the camp captain at Ruhleben, to be on the committee of the Kitchen Department, as reported in the Scotsman on 29/3/1915 (p.8) and the Times on 29/3/1915 ("More and Better Food at Ruhleben" p.4 col A). It is not known if this was the same individual. The department's remit was to control the kitchens and all questions regarding the food of the prisoners.
 
Also, a final thanks to philatelist Jim Mackay who contacted me in Dec 2007, who holds a camp envelope sent by Moore. His address is Barrack 2 box 5, and teh letter was sent on 27 May 1915 addressed to Mrs Henry J Moore, 82 D (or P)orchester Terrace, Hyde Park, London W.
 
 

J. Bremner Moore
 
J. Bremner Moore sent a postcard to a Miss Edna Moorhead at The Normandie, 36 - Chestnut, Philadelphia, pennsylvania, USA, from within the camp on February 23rd 1915, as noted through a sale on E-Bay in April 2006. Moore was interned in Barrack 2, box 5. The card's message reads:
Dear Edna,
 
Received your card yesterday; you have no idea how glad I was to hear from you - to get the photo. I can't understand the mail from the U.S. Oh well, the world has gone crazy so what's the use of worrying. Often wonder when I shall land in good old America again. Believe me when I (??) it to stay. I always had a hunch I would be popular over here - it's a (??) I'm not. Give the Shirley family my congratulations. Gee I am tired of being a Prisoner of War, it's a bum game. Remember me to all the folks. Write often... (next bit illegible)... Am (?) you are giving lessons again, don't spen all the money you make - I may want to borrow some when I get over.
 
Lots of love,
 
From... (illegible signature!).
Another two cards written by Moore to Edna in 1915 and on January 19th 1916 were put up for sale on E-Bay in July 2005, but the JPEG images on the auction sites had such low resolution that the messages are almost illegible. The card from 1915 is addressed to Edna, but the address has been scored out and someone else has put a forwarding address in its place - 626 Hughes Street, Casemay, New Jersey
 
It reads:
Dear Edna,
 
Just a note to let you all know that I am still very much alive but mighty sick of it all. Gee how I long to get back to the States again. When is that letter coming over. How's life at Cape (?), having a good time? ...(illegible bit)... My love to all the folks - hurry - write - tell me all the news.
 
Love as ever,
 
(Signature).
The other letter is unfortunately completely illegible from the JPEG displayed.
 
 

Reginald Victor Moore
 
Reginald Victor Moore is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Moore is recorded as having been born on June 20th 1895 in London, and is described as having been a stockbroker's clerk prior to his internment. His home address was listed as Grove Avenue, Muswell Hill, London, N. At the time the register was recorded, Moore was noted as staying in box 12, having transferred there from the Tea House on April 19th 1915.
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1916 at FO383/207 regarding a request by Charles Moore to be allowed to send money to his son, R. V. Moore, via Holland.
 
 

W. Moore
 
W. Moore was listed in The Times of January 8th 1916 ("Released Civilians" p.5, col. D) as one of 69 men released from Ruhleben on Thursday, January 6th, 1916, who subsequently travelled to Flushing for their return trip to England.
 
 

William Moore
 
William Moore was a former race horse trainer for the German Kaiser, prior to being interned and sent to Ruhleben. He was released in July 1916, and returned to England, via Flushing, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper of July 10th 1916 ("18 British Subjects Released from Ruhleben", p.7).
 
Moore's release was also recorded in the Times of July 8th 1916 ("Back from Germany", p.7, col.A) where he was noted as having arrived at Gravesend on July 7th 1916, having been released from Ruhleben.
 
In April 2008, I received the following additional infromation on Moore, for which I am grateful:
William Moore, button #12, had been trainer for the King of Wurttemberg (Weil) until about 1900. In 1890 he was second jockey for Baron Oppenheim (Schlenderhan). In 1914 a certain W. Moore held a legitimation card.
 
 
Christopher W. Morgan
 
Christopher W. Morgan was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 2. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

David W. Morgan
 
The National Archives in London holds documents from 1915 at FO383/78 regarding Mrs. Henrietta Morgan, a British subject formerly residing in Cologne, and wife of David W. Morgan, a British civilian interned at Ruhleben. They include a letter for transmission to Mrs. Morgan from her landlord relative to rent due, a report that the landlord had been told to sell the furniture, and a request for steps to be taken to safeguard certain papers, and subsequent arrangements to do so.
 
 

E. Morgan
 
The name of prisoner E. Morgan as an inmate at Ruhleben was supplied to me by Elizabeth Beasley, daughter of prisoner Jack Griggs, in January 2006. The name appears in a Spanish grammar owned by her father whilst in the Camp, and dated July 1915. In the book, Morgan's address was noted as Barrack XI, Box 1.
 
 

Harry Paul Morgan
 
Harry Paul Morgan is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Morgan is recorded as having been born on October 26th 1893 in Belfast, and is described as having been a horseman prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 79 Joy Street, Belfast. At the time the register was recorded, Morgan was noted as staying in loft A.
 
Morgan was also noted as residing in loft A on a postal order dated 23 NOV 1915, as held in photocopy form by Dr Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

Alexander Moriarty
 
In the National Archives catalogue, documents from 1915 are held at FO 383/11 with regard to Alexander Moriarty, a British subject who was resident in Ghent. They concerned enquiries regarding his reasons for remaining in Brussels, questions of remittances being sent to him from UK, and reports of him being taken prisoner and detained at Ruhleben.
 
 

James Morley
 
James Morley is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Morley is recorded as having been born on November 14th 1870 in Bradford, and is described as having been a fisherman on the "Jenobia" prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 15 Holiard Street, Grimsby. At the time the register was recorded, Morley was noted as staying in loft A, having been there since his arrival from Senne on October 29th 1915. He returned to England on January 2nd 1918. 
 
 

C. V. Morris
 
The National Archives in London hold records from 1915 at FO383/72 concerning a British Red Cross and Order of St John enquiry on behalf of Mrs. Morris in respect of her son, C. V. Morris, interned at Ruhleben.
 
 

Ernest Norman Morris
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Ernest Norman Morris was from Grimsby, where he was born on 28 MAY 1893. He was a ship's officer, and was arrested in Hamburg in August 1914, and after a brief period of imprisonment on the hulks, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 4.
 
It is liukely that he was recorded as a mistranscribed G. N. Morris, of Grimsby, in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

Dr. George Herbert Morrison
 
Dr. George Herbert Morrison is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Morrison is recorded as having been born on September 29th 1888 in Wellington, New Zealand, and is described as having been a student prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 491 Fulham Palace Road, Londonn S.W. At the time the register was recorded, Morrison was noted as staying in loft A.
 
After dying in a bus accident in Edinburgh on August 23rd, at the age of 37, his obituary in The Times on August 28th 1935 ("Dr. G. H. Morrison", p.12, col. E) gives some of his background prior to Ruhleben, and his time there:
"Dr. George Herbert Morrison... was a son (his only brother was killed in the War) of the late Dr. Morrison, of the Wellington Church, Glasgow, perhaps the most famous Scottish preacher of his day. He was educated at Glasgow Academy, and a sa boy of 16 was studying German in Berlin when the War broke out, and he was interned in Ruhleben camp - four years which at an impressionable age left a permanent mark upon him. He made good use of his time there, however, by learning to write and speak German as fluently as English..."
 
 

Vice-Consul Morrison-Cleator
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO 383/21 concerning the death in Ruhleben hospital of prisoner Mr. Morrison-Cleator, formerly H.M. Vice-Consul at Mannheim.
 
 

J. Moresby-White
 
The National Archives in London contain documents from 1915 at FO 383/24 relating to J. Moresby-White, a British civilian in Ruhleben. The documents relate to a possible exchange of Moresby-White for a British interned German consular official called Arthur Harnack.
 
Moresby-White is further recorded in the fourth issue of the magazine (August 1916, p.38) with an average cricket score of 37.80 runs per inning, having scored 189 runs in total for 5 innings in several July matches.
 
 

G. H. Morrison
 
G. H. Morrison was thanked for articles written for the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
 

Quentin Morvaren
 
Quentin Morvaren was noted in the Scotsman of May 12th 1915 as having played the piano at the camp's first Burns Night celebration ("A Burns Celebration in a German Prison", p.14).
 
Morvaren's contribution to life in the camp is recorded in the Musical Notes section of the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917):

"An element of trovelty has been lent to the Orchestral Concerts by the first appearance of two new conductors in the perosns of Mr. Quentin Morvaren and Mr. W. Pauer. Mr. Morvaren is an energetic young man who believes in doing nothing by halves - whether engaged in bringing Sullivan up to date, or in the arrangement of an orchestral concert, he may be relied upon to give his listeners a fll measure of interest, with possibly a mild shock as well. Other conductors have made severe demands on the necessarily limited powers of our Camp Orchestra, but in asking it to tackle a work such as Max Reger's "Ballet Suite", Mr. Morvaren was expecting it to achieve the impossible. The work, which may be taken as representing the composer in lighter vein, is nevertheless heavy enough, and is copiously strewn with those intricacies of part-writing and rhthm which are the toy of Reger's admirers and an offence to those who love him not. In any case, it needs extraordinarily finished playing if it is to sound at all well. The fact that the performance, in spite of some grotesque cracklings from the woodwind, was such as to give a very fair idea of the work as a whole, is in itself a very fine tribute to the splendid musicianship of Mr. Morvaren, as well as to the untiring zeal with which he and the members of the orchestra devoted themselves to the work of rehearsal. Mr. Pauer - less ambitious than Mr. Morvaren - presented nevertheless a very interesting and well-chosen programme, which included, among other works, Bach's Brandenburg Concerto in G, of which a well-balanced and spirited performance was given, Mozart's Overture to "Don Giovanni", quite excellently played, and the Morris Dance, Shepherd's Hey, "dished up for room-music twelvesome" by Percy Grainger. The interest of the Programme and the general excellence of the renderings entitle this concert to a high place among Ruhleben musical events."

"To Mr. Morvaren belongs the honour of having produced the first original composition in Ruhleben, but even the Overture to "Androcles and the Lion" gave evidence of unusual talent, in spite of the very limited resources available in those distant days. Mr. Morvaren's subsequent ventures in this direction have more than confirmed the good impression then created, and his career is one which will be watched with eager interest."

 

Samuel Moses
 
See Simon Moses.
 
 
Simon Moses
 
Simon Moses was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. He was described as a 31 year old teacher previously at work in Berlin.
 
It is believed that Moses was misrecorded as Samuel Moses in a list also found in FO 369/710, dated 11 OCT 1914, as communicated to the Foreign Office by a Nurse Coe (with thanks to Simon Fowler).
 
Simon Moses was later recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 37 Berkley Street, Liverpool.
 
 
A. S. Moss
 
A. S. Moss was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as The Drive, Kersal.
 

Louis C. Mottley

The National Archives in London holds documents from 1915 at FO383/26 regarding Louis C Mottley, namely an enquiry from his father, C. G. Mottley of Wood Street, London.
 
 

Edouard Moulle
 
Edouard Moulle's contribution to life in the camp is recorded in the Musical Notes section of the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917):
"Mr. Frederick Keel and Mr. F. W. Hughesdon have given genuine pleasure by their singing, of particular interest being Mr. Keel's performance of some beautiful Folk-Tunes from Normandy and Brittany, arranged with admirable ingenuity and perfect taste by MM. Edouard Moulle and Bourgault-Ducoudraye."
 
 

James L. Mounsey
 
James L. Mounsey was an Edinburgh University man who was interned in Ruhleben after the outbreak of war. The Scotsman newspaper on 1/1/1915 (p.8) recorded the text of the following postcard sent to Edinburgh University:
"Best greetings to the old 'Varsity from the following students and ex-students at present resident at Ruhleben - James L. Mounsey; H. J. W. Tillyard, lecturer in Greek; W. J. Crosland Briggs, M.A., 1914; Harold Luck, M.A., 1913; M. F. Liddle, M.A., 1909; J. Halliday, M.A., 1914; James Peebles Conn, Bucher scholar in music, 1902; J. M. Dickson, M.A., BSc., Agric.; R. Herdman Pender, M.A., teacher in George Heriot's School; E. G. Burgoyne, J. Fleming, 1895-97; Robert McNeil, 1905-6; Eric G. Riddell, 1908-9, former students."
Mounsey was also named in the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p. 32) as being a recent inclusion to the camp's Barbarians rugby team.
 
Mounsey is further noted in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.38) as being involved in one of thecamp's more memorable cricket matches:
No match has created the same amount of interest in Ruhleben as that between Masterman's XI v. "The Next" XVI. Spice was added to this contest of the best 27 cricketers in the Camp, by the arranging of a "Sweepstake", by McPherson of 9, in which practically every man in the Lager took a sporting chance in this original idea. Each ticket held a combination of three players and the ticket bearing the names of the three highest scorers was the winner of the prize. This fell to the fortunate holder of the Masterman 91, Steadman 60, (not out) and Mounsey 26. In this match Dutton, for "The Rest" bowled brilliantly and took 4 for 25.
 
 

David Movetha (Mowetha)
 
David Movetha was a black British Ruhleben prisoner released in October 1916, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper of October 9th 1916 ("Released from Ruhleben - Arrival of British Party at Rotterdam", p.6).
 
David Mowetha (sic) was also noted in the Times of October 7th 1916 ("Back From Germany", p.7, col. E) as one of five men released from Ruhleben in September 1916, who were hospitably cared for by the Society of Friends.
 
 
Frank Clifford Mueller (?)
 
Frank Clifford Mueller (?) was noted on a letter dated 1915 from London as being in Barrack 11 (possibly box 4), a copy of which is held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

George Augustus Muenk
 
George Augustus Muenk is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Muenk is recorded as having been born on October 13th 1894 in London, and is described as having been a waiter prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 11 Grantbridge Street, Islington, N. At the time the register was recorded, Muenk was noted as staying in box 23. He later returned to Holland on April 25th 1918.
 
 

Daniel Mulholland
 
From Marcus Bateman's merchant seamen POW website, Daniel Mulholland is noted as the First Engineer serving on the City of Berlin, from 67 Limestone Road, Belfast, Antrim, born in approximately 1880.
 
In March 2007, Daniel's grandson Gerald Bunting contacted me with the following information.
"He (Daniel) was the first engineer on a merchant vessel which was in either Hamburg or Bremen at the time.  I believe the vessel was the "City of Berlin" which may have belonged to the Palgrave Murphy & Co. line of Dublin.  Daniel Mulholland died long before I was born and the information I have is a bit sketchy.  However, my family did discover an old oil painting of the "City of Berlin"  at my late grandmother's house several years ago and my father mentioned that Mulholland was held as a P.O.W. at a camp in or near Spandau. My great aunt Veronica mentioned that he spent the war living in a stable and, that although there were a lot of organized entertainments, he found conditions rather hellish.
 
"My great grandfather had a lot of bad luck with ships.  He apparently worked for Harland & Wolfe and then Cunard.  He took my grandmother (then age 7) to watch the Titanic being launched.  He then sailed on the Titanic as part of the guarantor crew (I got that information from James Cameron, the director of "Titanic" when I met him a few years ago).  He got off at the last stop before the crossing.  After WWI his family was destitute because he had been unable to provide for them during the war. They came to the US on a coin flip (heads: New York, tails: New South Wales).  He worked for the United Fruit Company on some of their vessels in the early '20's.  He became a US citizen in about 1924 and then went to work for a film studio in Astoria, New York.  The studio may have been connected to Metro Goldwyn Meyer (MGM)."
Many thanks indeed to Daniel for sharing this information, it is much appreciated!
 
 
Wilhelm Müller (1885 - 1965)
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding a Mr. Muller, an Australian interned in Ruhleben.
 
From Tony Barker, grandson to Wilhelm, I received the following information on Wilhelm in April 2008, for which I am extremly grateful.
Wilhelm Müller was born on 29 May 1885 at Meßkirch, in Baden, Germany, the son of Wilhelm Müller, a master saddler. At the age of seventeen the young Wilhelm migrated to Australia, where his elder married sister was already living, and worked in his brother-in-law's leather-goods factory in Sydney. By 1913 he had become a naturalised Australian citizen and was married (to the daughter of English migrants) and had three children. It was at this time that he and his family decided to make an extended visit to Germany, perhaps with the intention of remaining indefinitely and, as the only son, eventually taking over his father's business. They had been in Germany for about a year when the war broke out. Wilhelm, being an Australian citizen and thus a British subject, was detained and subsequently interned in Ruhleben. His wife and children, one of whom was my mother, were given twenty-four hours to leave the country. they made their way back to Australia.
 
Wilhelm Müller remained in Ruhleben for the duration of the war. In early 1919 he was repatriated by ship to Sydney, where was reunited with his wife and children. He resumed working for his brother-in-law and remained in his employment for the rest of his working life. The family in time anglicised their surname to Miller. He died in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney on 4 August 1965 at the age of eighty. 
 
 
 

E. H. L. Mummenhoff
 
The National Archives in London contain documents from 1915 at FO 383/24 relating to E. H. L. Mummenhoff, a British consular official imprisoned in Ruhleben.
 
 

D. G. Munro
 
D. G. Munro was one of four gentlemen to have sent the Provost of Leith a postcard from Ruhleben in December 1914, as recorded in the Scotsman newspaper on 1/1/1915 (p.6). The other signatories were R. H. A. Mackie, Matthew Duncan and Alexander T. Smith.
 
 

George Murcuszen
 
George Murcuszen was noted in the Scotsman newspaper for having caused a bit of trouble whilst at Ruhleben!
INTERNED BRITISH MERCHANT SENTENCED
 
LESE MAJESTE IN A GERMAN CAMP
 
AMSTERDAM, December 9.
 
Mr. George Murcuszen, aged 23, described as a British merchant, who wa sinterned at Ruhleben, has been sentenced by the Berlin Court to three months' imprisonment for lese majeste. The accused, in conversation with another interned man, who having a German mother is pro-German, annoyed him by saying that the German Empire would disappear from the map and that the German language would soon be a dead language. He also used expressions about the Kaiser, which were reported. Marcuszen was detained for five months in prebentive custody before his case was tried.
- CENTRAL NEWS
 
 

Carlo B. Murphy
 
The National Archives in London contain documents from 1915 at FO 383/23 relating to Carlo B. Murphy, a Canadian inmate, who it is requested should be added to the list of potential officials for exchange.
 
 

Charles Murphy
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 in FO 383/22 containing information on the proposed exchange of Charles Murphy, interned in Ruhleben, as a consular official.
 
 
J. Murray
 
J. Murray was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as Prince of Wales Inn, City Road, Hulme. 
 
 
Jack Murray
 
A copy of a postcard from a Jack Murray dated 24 JUL 1915 is held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria, listing him as in Barrack 10 Box 23 (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

John Murray
 
John Murray was responsible at the camp for some of the engineering classes that were given by sailors. In the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916) he was listed as about to give a lecture to the M.E.A. Circle entitled "Lining Off".
 
In issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), the following is also recorded under the Nautical Notes section:
"As regards engineering classes, the 'Chief's Class', under Mr. John Murray, reports a rather poor session owing to being very often frozen out of their school room; however with the warm weather and new quarters, better progress is anticipated."
A copy of a postcard from a John Murray dated 6 NOV 1915 is held by Dr Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria, listing him as in Barrack 10 Box 21, though it is unclear whether this is the same man as yet (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

J. O'Hara Murray
 
NB: This may be the same person as John Murray, above.
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding J. O'Hara Murray, an invalided civilian held at Ruhleben. The documents specifically deal with an enquiry from his friend, Robert A. Smith of Westminster.
 
O' Hara Murray was also listed in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.45) as being one of the better players in the Ruhleben Tennis Association.
 
 
Robert Murray

Robert Murray is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Murray is recorded as having been born on June 19th 1885 at North Berwick, and is described as having been a professional golfer prior to his internment. His home address was listed as c/o Frau Thalheim, Sorbenstr 3, Dresden-Seydnitz. At the time the register was recorded, Murray was noted as staying in box 23.
 
Between November 5th and November 14th 1917, Murray spent some time in the camp's Schonungsbaracke, and later spent a period of five weeks in the Lazarett, between February 14th 1918 and March 22nd. He later relocated to Holland on March 22nd 1918.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Murray is noted as being from North Berwick, Scotland, and as having been born in North Berwick in 1885. He worked as a professional golfer in Dresden, where he was arrested on 26 NOV 1914. After a brief period held in Dresden and Berlin, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
Murray's internment was also noted in the Scotsman newspaper of June 22nd 1915 ("Golfing Topics", p.9), which describes him as a member of Dresden Golf Club.
 
The following additional information on Murray was received from Hamburg based golf historian Christopher N. Meister in November 2007, for which I am eternally grateful:

Robert Murray arrived in Germany 1907 when he took up an engagement as golf professional Dresden Golf Club, where he stayed until 1914 when he got arrested. At Dresden he met his future wife, a local girl from (Mrs. Thalheim?) Dresden.

 

In 1910 he designed the golf course of the newly founded Munich Golf Club together with Sir Ralph Paget.

 

In 1919, after having been released from Ruhleben in the previous year, Murray moved to work in the Hermitage Golf Club at Copenhagen in Denmark where he stayed as a Golf professional until 1928. He then moved back to Germany to work in the newly opened Luebeck-Travemuender Golf Club on the shores of the Baltic Sea, where he stayed until 1939.

 

His greatest success in Germany was when he won the German Professional Golfers Championship in 1930. He was a runner-up of the same championship in 1911, he finished 3rd in 1928 and fourth in both the 1931 and the 1932 championship. Also Bob Murray won the 1925 Scandinavian Open.

 

With the help of some club members he managed to escape to Denmark, where he worked as a professional for a short time at Aalborg. Shortly before leaving Murray was appearantly thinking about taking the German nationality (Deutsche Golfzeitung, March 15th, 1940). While still in Denmark he was again caught up by the Germans there in 1940. He stayed in this camp for 5 years – what a misery of a life!

 

 

Guy B. Muscott
 
The National Archives in London holds documents from 1915 at FO383/78 concerning Guy B Muscott, a British subject interned at Ruhleben, specifically a  request for information regarding the financial situation of his firm in Germany after having been placed under state supervision.
 
 

Caleb S. Musgrave

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Caleb S. Musgrave was a prisoner at Ruhleben, as confirmed by a postcard that he posted from the camp (date unknown), which was later placed for sale on E-Bay in December 2005. The card depicts a group of men pulling a loaded cart, and is addressed to Mrs Caleb S. Musgrave, Sydenham Villas, Bray, County Wicklow, Ireland. Musgrave is listed as interned priosner in Barrack 7, box 20, Ruhleben.
 
A second postcard, addressed to a Master Tim Musgrave, c/o Miss Smiley, 19 Salisbury Avenue, Belfast, Ireland, was also put up for sale a month earlier, in November 2005. The front of the card depicts Bond Street within the camp, and the reverse again tells us that Musgrave was interned in Barrack 7, box 20.
 
In January 2008, the following memories of Caleb were shared by Doug Coldwell, to whom I am eternally grateful:
Thanks for all your efforts to produce the website and list of names. I was interested to see the name of Caleb Musgrave with a few details of his stay there. He and his wife were my Godparents, probably because they provided shelter and support to my Mother during wartime (1939-45 ) in the Croydon area. They had a large house with a cellar in Sydenham Road which provided some shelter from the large number of objects falling from the skies. ( I was born in 1945 ).

They were originally from Cork in Ireland and he was a teacher of foreign languages at Whitgift School in Croydon. I believe that on the outbreak of war in 1914 he was studying at Heidelberg University. They were both leaving Germany by riverboat on the Rhine when it was checked for aliens. They were told that all English were to be interned but that as they were Irish they could proceed. He was a man of high principles ( or naive ) and insisted that he was British and hence found himself at Ruhleben. I believe that she was sent on her way. As I knew "K" as he was called, he was extremely gaunt as a result of his WW1 experiences, although he must have been 80 ish when he died.
Dr. Horst Pöethe, president of the Herrigsche Gesselschaft (Germany's oldest literary society), contacted me in May 2008 to say that he had found many books in second hand stores in Berlin which had previously been part of the Ruhleben Camp Library. Inside the covers of some of these books were names of former prisoners, which he has kindly forwarded to me. The following is the signature of Caleb Musgrave, recorded as staying in Barrack XI, Box 20, on August 5th 1915:

 
 
Frank Lewis Mussett
 
Frank Lewis Mussett is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Mussett is recorded as having been born on August 6th 1889 in London, and is described as having been a buyer prior to his internment. His home address was listed as Comphausbadstr. 25, Aachen. At the time the register was recorded, Mussett was noted as staying in R.2. On May 18th 1918, Mussett was given indefinite leave from the camp.
 
In the seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp (Sep 1915, p.18), Musset placed a notice to advertise his "Ye Olde Campe Booke Shoppe" in Barrack 5, selling books from 2-4 in the main corridor. He noted that he was still endeavouring to secure a stock of all books in use in the school classes. He also placed another advert on p.40 for his book shop.
 
Musssett also placed an advert in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915. p.48), for his new bookstall:
Books, Music & War Maps - F. L. Mussett, Bar 5, Box 22, 2-4pm.
In the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, Mussett's shop was still going strong:
F. L. MUSSETT - The Camp's Official Book Shop, Bond Street (2pm - 5pm).
Mussett also had the honour to be lampooned by way of a monogram drawn in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), by artist CMAW.
 
 
Leo Myers
 
Leo Myers was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
 
Maurice Myers
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Maurice Myers is noted as being a student from "Redlands", Orchard Road, Middlesbrough. He was arrested in Frankfurt on 6 NOV 1914 and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 

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Charles Lee Napier
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Charles Lee Napier was from 13 Stanley Place, Chester, and born 19 FEB 1895 in Bellary, India. He was a student in hanover, and after his arrest on 6 NOV 1914 he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 
John Nappin

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John Nappin by Horsfall

John Nappin was interned in Barrack 8 and played for the barrack football team against Barrack 20 in the RFA cup final in April 1917, as noted in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917). The first match was a draw, 1-1. In the replay, three days later, Barrack 8 lost, 3-0.
 
John Nappin's granddaughter Laura Martin is currently researching his experience at the camp and in July 2006 very kindly supplied a copy of a portrait of Nappin, whilst he was interned, painted by C. M. Horsfall, a regular contributor to the various periodicals published at Ruhleben in the First World War, which is reproduced to the right.  
 
 
Frank Whitlock Narroway
 
From a photo of a National Archives file from collection MT9, supplied by Marcus Bateman in March 2007, it is known that on December 4th 1916, Frank Whitlock Narroway retruned from Dr. Weiler's Sanatorium to Barrack 10 (Camp Changes, Supplement 10). Many thanks to Marcus.
 
 

Ernest Henry Nash
 
Ernest Henry Nash is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Nash is recorded as having been born on May 8th 1880 in Mitcham, and is described as having been a warehouseman prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 6 Johns Place, Mitcham, Surrey. At the time the register was recorded, Nash was noted as staying in loft B.
 
Between September 26th 1917 and October 1st, Nash spent some time being treated at the Schonungsbaracke.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Nash is also noted as being from Mitcham in Surrey, and born there. He was a leather warehouseman in Cologne, where he was arrested on 6 SEP 1914. After a brief period held inCologne, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 

L. Nash
 
L. Nash was noted in issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917) as having satisfied the examiners at the London Matriculation Examination, held in the camp in December 1916.
 
A gentleman named Nash is also noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for the Rest of Ruhleben team against the Varsities, in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
 
Ottoual Naylor
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Ottoual Naylor was resident at W. St. Ambrose Grove,. Liverpool, was born in Liverpool on 23 AUG 1891, was a foreign correspondent arrested in Hamburg on 6 NOV 1914, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 1.
 
 

Fred Neats
 
Fred Neats was one of nine men released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Times of January 12th 1917 ("Nine Prisoners Released from Ruhleben", p.5, col. B).
 
 

Roland H. Nebel
 
Roland H. Nebel is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Nebel is recorded as having been born on June 2nd 1883, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 65 Mount Street, Charlton, Kent. At the time the register was recorded, Nash was noted as staying in loft A, to where he had transferred from Barrack 12 on April 19th 1915.
 
 

Eugene Neel
 
The National Archives in London hold a 1915 enquiry from Ruhleben inmate Eugene Neel's nephew, John Le Sueur of Jersey, regarding his uncle, held at FO383/26.
 
 

Neill
 
Neill was noted in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.34) as having appeared in the play "Liberty Hall":
Mr. Neill's Todman was a very amusing old fellow...
 
W. Neill
 
W. Neill was photographed as party of the Ruhleben Parcel Post. the image can be seen under Alfred Hazell King's entry.
 
 
Walter "Wally" R. Neizel
 
From a photo of a National Archives file from collection MT9, supplied by Marcus Bateman in March 2007, it is known that on December 4th 1916, Walter R. Neizel, of the Tea House Barrack, was granted leave to visit Berlin until March 5th 1917 (Camp Changes, Supplement 10). Many thanks to Marcus.
 
Thanks also to Dr. Robin Pelteret in Cape Town, South Africa, who contacted me in June 2009 to say that he owns a missive written by Wally which was sent to his father W. Neizel in Ladysmith, natal, in November 1915.
 
Futher thanks also to Martin Crawford for the following in June 2009:
Six years ago my wife and I bought a postcard album at a philatelic auction of the Royal Philatelic Society of Cape Town.  It contained a collection of over 350 old picture postcards from the first decade of the 1900s.  My wife, Marilyn, has developed it into a social history exhibit which she has entered in the past at the annual National Philatelic exhibition in South Africa (we live in Cape Town).  It tells the life of a Lilly Neizel whose father was a baker in the early 1900s in Ladysmith, Natal, South Africa.  Her father was German, the brother of a German missionary who had settled in South Africa in the late 1800s.  Lilly married a Scot who worked for the Eastern Telegraph company and they were posted to various places around the world.  There is correspondence to them from relations and friends in Scotland, Germany, South Africa, St Helena, Spain, Suez, Mozambique, etc, etc!

Recently another batch of this correspondence has surfaced some of which we have acquired and among these items was a Ruhleben-Spandau Englanderlager Internment Camp censored card.  Lillie had a brother Walter Robert Neizel who was born at Erasmusdam, Natal, South Africa on 13/04/1883.  He and one of his brothers went in the early 1900s to live in Germany, where he was an electrical engineer.  (The brother seems to have died soon after they arrived there).  We know Walter lived at times in Mittweida and/or Berlin, as we have other correspondence from him to Lilly.  She corresponded regularly with him, in German, and he died in 1966.  The Ruhleben card was sent by him with Christmas greetings to Lilly in 1914. He appears on your listing as an inmate in December 1916.

 

George Nesbitt
 
George Nesbitt, of Hull, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

R. M. A. Neuschild
 
The Liddle Collection at Leeds University holds a few items relating to the internment of R. M. A. Neuschild, under reference RUH 38. These are a lLetter from The British Red Cross Society dated November 14th 1918; a letter from M. S. Richard at the Government Committee on the Treatment by the Enemy of British Prisoners of War from February 11th 1919; a letter of reference dated February 21st 1920; a typescript curriculum vitae, from 1920 to 1948; and a photograph with two negatives. The online index also tells us that Neuschild was educated at the City of London School, and was in Berlin at the outbreak of the war. After internment in Ruhleben, he later had a career in gold mining.
 
Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria has a photocopy of 'Le Controleur' dated 19 FEB 1916 which states Neuschild to have been in Barrack 10 Box 22 (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

Julius Charles Neville
 
The Liddle Collection at Leeds University holds a typescript of recollections in diary form from August 6th to 14th 1914, three photostat photographs, and 2 photograph albums from 1914 to 1919, all relating to the internment of Julius C. Neville. the collection is sourced under reference RUH 37, and was placed in the university by Susan Neville in September 1977. The online index tells us that Neville, who died in 1977, was arrested aboard a steamer on the Rhine at Wesel, near the Dutch border, and then interned.
 
In December 2006 I was contacted by one of Neville's descendants, Wolfgang Dahm, based in Willich, Germany. From Wolfgang I have learned that Julis Charles Neville was in fact born as Julius Carl Dahm on 1 AUG 1895 in Bonn, and that he changed his name from Dahm to Neville because of some problems within the Dahm family. Julius' father was Carl Hermann Josef Dahm, born 7 APR 1850 in Bonn, who was married to Dollris Hermine (Bessy) Neville (22 APR 1858 London - 20 JUL 1909, Bonn). Many thanks to Wolfgang for this information.
 
 
Francis Newlands
 
Francis Newlands was first engineer on the 'Sinainn', and was originally from 66 Haggerston Road, Liverpool. He was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. Prior to his release he was based in the Sanitorium. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

Alfred Newlove
 
Alfred was 3rd mate on the Winterton, and born in 1894.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Alfred Newlove was noted as being from West View, Goole, and as having been born in 1894. He worked as a mariner and was arrested in Hamburg on 16 OCT 1914. After a brief spell imprisoned on the hulks in Hamburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 8.
 
See entry for William Newlove, his father.
 
 
William Newlove
 
William Newlove was stated to be an English tourist who was interned in Ruhleben after his arrest when hostilities broke out. The Scotsman newspaper of February 20th 1918 briefly describes his visit to the king at Buckingham Palace with two other former Ruhleben prisoners, after their release from the camp ("King Receives Repatriate Prisoners", p.4).
 
From this site's guestbook, a slightly different story from William's great granddaughter Angela in June 2011 :

My great Grandfather William Newlove and his son Alfred Newlove were Captain and 3rd mate respectively sailing from Hull Yorkshire to the port of Hamburg. War was declared and whilst they were there and they were sent to Ruhleben for the remainder of the of the war. My Grandfather actually painted a watercolour which shows the barbed wire and the dress of the prisoners.

William Newlove is confirmed by Marcus Bateman to be master of the Winterton in files within MT9/1238, and to have been released 7 JAN 1918. His home address, and that for his son Alfred, was West View, Rawcliffe, and like Alfred he was also from Goole in Yorkshire.

 

Newton
 
Newton was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Scotsman newspaper on January 31st 1917 ("British Civilians From Ruhleben", p.6).
 
 

E. Newton
 
E. Newton was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
E. Newton, of South Shields, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
It is likely that this was the same E. Newton whose signature was recorded by fellow internee Christopher Cornforth on June 10th 1916, in an autograph book now held at the Imperial War Museum. This gent was interned in the Barrack XI loft. (Many thanks to Christopher's granddaughter Christine Pierce who provided this information in December 2007.)
 
 

H. Griffith Newton
 
H. Griffith Newton was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
 
The National Archives also holds documents from 1915 at FO 383/25 concerning Newton, which contain enquiries regarding his possible release.
 
The archive holds further records at FO383/207 from 1916, regarding enquiries from Newton's wife and from Mr. H. Fitchen of the Kingsway Press Limited following reports of Newton having been placed under special arrest at Ruhleben Camp.
 
As reported in the Times of May 23rd 1918 ("At Ruhleben", p.7, Col. F), Newton gave an address on May 22nd 1918 to the Institute of Printers about his three years experience at Ruhleben. The article describes Newton as a member of the Letterpress and Lithographic Printing Trades, and gives a background to his arrest, as well as a description of life in the camp. Newton was arrested at a railway station whilst travelling on business in Germany before the declaration of war. He was kept under guard for 21 days in the town, before being allowed to travel to Berlin, where he was promptly arrested again, despite having the correct papers and a pass from he Commander on the Western front. He then travelled in a cab, at his own expense, with a detective to the police station in Berlin, where he stayed until November 14th 1914, after which he was transferred to Ruhleben. 
 
At one point, Newton escaped and remained free for about 14 or 15 hours, before being captured and returned to a Berlin prison, before returning to Ruhleben. He also claimed to have met Captain Fryatt at the camp, who had denied that he had been discovered with papers and a watch by which he had been identified.
 
 

Ivor Newton
 
Ivor Newton was recorded in The Times on June 23rd 1922 as being one of the former Ruhleben inmates to have given a concert at the Aeolian Hall, where he played the piano ("Recitals of the Week", p. 12, col. B):
"Mr. Newton understands the art of combined playing; his part in Max Bruch's Concerto in G minor was better than that of the violin, which was more than once out of tune..."
 
L. Newton
 
L. Newton is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Newton was a merchant seaman on board the Coralie Horlock, and interned in Barrack 11, loft.
 
 

Dr. Alfred Edgar Niblett (1888-1973)
 
Dr. Alfred Edgar Niblett was an internee in Ruhleben, as explained by his grandson John Rigg in July 2006. Amongst the personal documents that Alfred accrued in the camp, which were passed onto John's mother, were two editions of the camp magazine.
 
Alfred was born in Osnabruck, the son of an English father and German mother.  He graduated from the University of Birmingham in 1911 and submitted the first part of his doctoral dissertation to the University of Munich in 1913. It is assumed that Alfred was studying and/or lecturing when the First World War broke out.
 
He later became a distinguished foreign languages teacher in Leeds until his retirement in the early 1950s, and remained in the city until his eventual death in 1973.  He married in 1919 and had two daughters and four grandchildren.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Niblett was from 1 Broomfield Avenue, Palmers Green, London, and born in 1886 in Osnabruck. He was an assistant master in Osnabruck and following his arrest on 3 NOV 1914 was sent to Hanover and then Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 

Nichol
 
Nichol is recorded in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.37) as being a medium paced bowler playing cricket for the Barrack 3 side.
 
Nichol was further noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the losing Brearley's XI side against Cameron's XI on October 7th 1916. The score was 4-2 to the Cameron team.
 
 
 
John H. M. Nichols (1885 - 1970)
 
The following on John H. M. Nichols was contributed by his son James in July 2008, for which I am extremely grateful.
John Nichols was an electrical engineer working for a British firm in Berlin at the outset of the war. He was interned almost immediately; he thought on information passed to the authorites by his landlady, because he was a keen photographer, and open to suspicion.  As a result he went straight to Spandau Prison where he remained for two week in solitary confinemet while being interrogated.  He was then moved to Ruhleben.
 
He was a great friend of Dan Jenkins; not I think th D Jenkins in your index, but the other one. Dan was very much a Welshman, and a great rugger player. I knew the Jenkins family well as a boy after the War, as we were neighbours.  Dan gave me a very nice trout rod when I went to work in Kenya in 1948.
 
Father died the day before his 85th birthday.  He was not bitter about the Germans after The Great War.
 
 
 
M. J. Nicholson
 
M. J. Nicholson was one of the internees photographed with the Ruhleben Parcel Post - see Alfred Hazell King's entry for the image.
 
 
Ernest Nickers
 
Ernest Nickers was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. He was described as a 24 year old student who had been working in Berlin.
 
 
Gordon Nicoll
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Gordon Nicoll was from 12 Alyth Gardens, Golders Green, London, and born in Dundee in 1897. He was a student in Calw, and was arrested on 6 NOV 1914 and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 

S. S. Nicoll
 
Nicoll was named in the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p. 32) as being a member of the camp's Nomads rugby team.
 
He is included in the photograph at the following link - Steve Bloomer's Farewell Match - and was also photographed as a member of the Ruhleben Parcel Post (see Alfred Hazell King's entry for the photo).
 
 

Bertie Alfred Noakes
 
Bertie Alfred Noakes is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Noakes is recorded as having been born on March 24th 1881 in London, and is described as having been a teacher prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 165 Rye Lane, Peckham, London, N.E. At the time the register was recorded, Noakes was noted as staying in Box 5.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Noakes is noted as being from 19 Horsham Avenue, Finchley, and as having been born in London in 1881. He worked as a clerk in Dusseldorf, where he was arrested on 21 SEP 1914. After a brief period held in Dusseldorf, Wesel and Duisburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5. 
 
 

W. Noall
 
W. Noall, of Sunderland, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 
E. G. Noble
 
In a list of prisoners from the Wolf transferred to Ruhleben in A. H. F. Clarke's "To Kiel on the German Raider Wolf and Beyond", E. G. Noble is noted as a Ruhleben prisoner, brother of cricketer W. A. Noble, captured on the ship Matunga in early 1918. See entry for Alfred Henry Frank Clarke.
 
 

Izaac Norman
 
Izaac Norman was one of sixteen men released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Times of January 29th 1917 ("Changed Conditions in Germany", p.8, col. G).
 
 
C. H. North
 
C. H. North was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 60 Lancaster Road, Fallowfield.
 
 
Frederick North
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Frederick North was from 79 Burntwood Lane, Tooting London, born in London in 1888 and was a clerk. He was arrested in Berlin on 6 NOV 1914, imprisoned in the Stadtvogtei and then sent on to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 2.
 
 

Ambrose Norton
 
Ambrose Norton was listed in The Times of January 8th 1916 ("Released Civilians" p.5, colD) as one of 69 men released from Ruhleben on Thursday, January 6th, 1916, who subsequently travelled to Flushing for their return trip to England.
 
 

William Novell
 
The Scotsman newspaper reported on March 9th 1916 that William Novell had been released from Ruhleben a couple of days earlier ("Released from Ruhleben", p.5).
 
 

Reginald Nowlan
 
Reginald Nowlan is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Nowlan is recorded as having been born on April 18th 1889 in Edinburgh, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was listed as 28 Mildmay Grove, canonbury, London, N. At the time the register was recorded, Nowlan was noted as staying in box 23.
 
 

Ronald Lloyd Nunn
 
The Times of January 20th 1915 (page 4, col. A) tells us that a postcard sent to the paper and signed by Ruhleben inmates John W. Lintner, A. J. Dolphin, R. L. Nunn, Wm., Stern, E. Williams and W. S. Cohn wished for a "happy Christmas and a brighter New Year".
 
The National Archives in London holds documents from 1915 at FO383/26 concerning Ronald Lloyd Nunn, more specifically an enquiry from his father, Mr. F. Nunn.
 
The archives hold further documents from 1916 at FO383/207, namely a further request from Mr. F. Nunn for assistance in securing the release on health grounds of his son Ronald, and an enquiry about regulations governing the sending of money to prisoners. There is also a letter from Ronald Nunn on the exchange rate for remittances.
 
More documents are held at FO383/208 regarding enquiries by Nunn's parents about the non-delivery of parcels containing butter at Ruhleben Camp, and about the possibilities of their son's release.
 
 

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