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THE RUHLEBEN STORY

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Prisoners
G - H
 

In many cases, prisoners are referred to by surname only in the source material, making it difficult to know exactly who the individual may have been. This will have led to some duplication in the lists. Check for an individual under their full name, but also under the surname as well.
 
If you can link any of these anonymous surnames to listings with a full name, please contact me so that I can amend the entry.
 

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G
 
 
E. F. Gaine
 
E. F. Gaine, of Grimsby, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

Gale
 
Gale was noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the losing A side in a second division match between the A team and the B team on October 3rd 1916. The score was B: 4 to A: 1.
 
 

Frank Gale
 
Chief Engineer Frank Gale, of the Marney, was interned after his boat had been sunk by the Germans. After his capture, he was initially sent to Sennelager Camp, before being transferred to Ruhleben. In an article in the Scotsman newspaper of January 8th 1918, Gale is interviewed about his time in Ruhleben, with particular detail on the declining food supply situation in both the camp and in Germany at large ("Conditions in Germany - Repatriated Prisoner on his Experiences", p.4).
 
Gale was also quoted in The Times of the same day, giving an account
of Christmas Day at Ruhleben:
"On Christmas Day each man was given four potatoes, about the size of walnuts, for dinner. This was the official ration, but happily, it was supplemented by boxes from home, The supplies from England had been the life an dsoul of the place, and perhaps there wa ssome temptation to the Germans to reduce the quantity of supplies from their own resources. We could not have lived without the extras. When we were first interned the Germans told us they would make English swine feed out of tubs like pigs, but, latterly, w ehave had the pleasure of seeing the German sentries go round to our swill tubs, dip their hands in, and grab what they could get for eating. I have noticed that done repeatedly."
Gale also noted that for the most part, food shops were all closed in Berlin, with none open at ll for the sale of meat, fish or game.
 
 
Maximilian J. Garben
 
Maximilian J. Garben was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 15. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

Alexander Davidson Garden
 
Alexander Davidson Garden is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Garden is recorded as having been born on February 21st 1894 in Aberdeen, and is described as having been a student prior to his internment. His home address was 96 Powis Place, Aberdeen. At the time the register was recorded, Garden was noted as staying in loft A, having transferred there from Barrack 3 on November 9th 1915.
 
Garden is also recorded as having spent some time in the Bird Cage between March 18th 1918 and March 23rd, and then in the Lazarett from August 3rd 1918 to October 1st. he is back in the Lazarett again on October 15th, although there is no date listed for a release from there.
 
Garden was noted as playing on the Rest of the World side, led by Cameron, in a mock international between England and the Rest of the World on May 2nd 1915. Kick off took place at 4.30pm, and a document with the teams listed was recently discovered amongst some Foreign Office files by the National Archives, in November 2005.
 
Garden was also noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as being from Barrack 5, and as having played for the losing Brearley's XI side against Cameron's XI on October 7th 1916. The score was 4-2 to the Cameron team.  
 
 
Garland
 
In a list of prisoners from the Wolf transferred to Ruhleben in A. H. F. Clarke's "To Kiel on the German Raider Wolf and Beyond", Garland is noted as a Ruhleben prisoner from Sarawak, captured on the ship Hitachi Maru in early 1918. See entry for Alfred Henry Frank Clarke.
 
 

Albert Edward Garnham
 
Albert Edward Garnham is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Garnham is recorded as having been born on November 9th 1872 in Chelmondiston, and is described as having been a seaman on the "Carisbrooke Castle" prior to his internment. His home address was Chelmondiston in Suffolk. At the time the register was recorded, Garnham was noted as staying in loft B.
 
 

John Sanford Garrard
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/59 regarding an enquiry from T. W. Garrard of Middlesbrough about the death of his brother John Sanford Garrard whilst interned in Ruhleben, and of his estate.
 
 

John Gatey
 
John Gatey was one of nine men over the age of 55 released from Ruhleben at the beginning of May 1916, as noted in the Times of May 9th 1916 ("British Prisoners from Germany", p.5, col.F).
 
 

Harris Geduld
 
Harris Geduld and his eight year old son Sol were both interned in Ruhleben at the outbreak of the war.
 
Many thanks to Sol's son Harry M. Geduld for providing this information in July 2007.
 
 
 
Sol Geduld
 
Eight year old Sol Geduld and his father, Harris Geduld, were both interned in Ruhleben at the outbreak of the war.
 
Many thanks to Sol's son Harry M. Geduld for providing this information in July 2007.
 
 

Rudolf A. Geiler
 
Rudolf A. Geiler is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Geiler is recorded as having been born on June 11th 1891 in Sale, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was Thron Lea, Wardle Road, Sale, Manchester. At the time the register was recorded, Geiler was noted as staying in box 3, having transferred there from Barrack 12 on November 13th 1915.
 
 

Joseph Gelin
 
Joseph Gelin was one of six prisoners released from Ruhleben in October 1917, who made their way to Rotterdam to proceed to England, as reported in The Times of October 5th 1917 ("Imperial and Foreign News", p.7, col. F).
 
 

Sydney Mildmay Gentry
 
Sydney Mildmay Gentry is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Gentry is recorded as having been born on December 13th 1895 in Brightlingsea, and is described as having been a seaman on the "Tintara" prior to his internment. His home address was 7 Francis Street, Brightlingsea. At the time the register was recorded, Gentry was noted as staying in Box 4.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Gentry is noted as being from 7 Francis Street, Brightlinsea, Essex, and as having been born in Brightlinsea in 1895. He worked as a seaman in Remagen, where he was arrested on 1 AUG 1914. After a brief period held in Remagen, Donaueschingen and Berlin, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 
G. Gerlock
 
G. Gerlock is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Gerlock was a civilian interned in Barrack 9.
 
 
P. George
 
P. George was a member of the Ruhleben Prisoners' Release Committee, and is noted as an ex-Ruhleben POW in its report in february 1917 entitled "The Ruhleben Prisoners: The Case for their Release". (Many thanks to Jim MacKay for supplying a copy of this document in December 2007.)
 
 
James Gibbons
 
James Gibbons was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 40 Wallace Street, Bolton.
 
 

Edward Gibson
 
Edward Gibson is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Gibson is recorded as having been born on June 2nd 1874 in Canton, China, and is described as having been a teacher prior to his internment. His home address was 22 Kreuzstrasse, Karlsruhe. At the time the register was recorded, Gibson was noted as staying in loft B, and as having later moved to Barrack 7 on January 2nd 1918.
 
 

H. S. Gielston
 
H. S. Gielston, of Selcombe, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

Gilan
 
Gilan was appointed in March 1915 by Powell, the camp captain at Ruhleben, to be on the committee of the Kitchen Department, as reported in the Scotsman on 29/3/1915 (p.8) and the Times on 29/3/1915 ("More and Better Food at Ruhleben" p.4 col A). The department's remit was to control the kitchens and all questions regarding the food of the prisoners.
 
 
Grup Gilbert
 
The following letter was written by a Grup Gilbert upon his internment, to someone named Clifford, presumably back in England. It is currently in the possession of Dave Nelson, to whom I am indebted:
Englander Lager
Ruhleben bei Spandau
Barrack 12
 
Dear Clifford,
 
Perhaps you know by now that we have been sent here. We are well so far and all right. There is a great number of all cast and conditions of mankind here. To have something to do I am post warden for my barrack. Will you please if you can let mabel have £10 - - You will know that I can not send any money. We must square up later. We sent you some Xmas card. Look after these they are very scarce. Yours (indecipherable)
 
Grup Gilbert
 

J. D. Gilbert

jdgilbertrcmno6.jpg
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J. D. Gilbert is noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for the Varsities team against the Rest of Ruhleben, in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
A sketch of J. D. Gilbert was drawn by fellow inmate C. M. Horsfall on April 20th 1917 in Ruhleben, and published in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917).
 
The following text accompanied the drawing:
"Mr. Gilbert's excellence as an all-round sportsman is well known to all of us and we are glad to be able to publish the portrait of such a popular though retiring personality. Hockey, cricket, football, skating and tennis are the sports in which Mr. Gilbert's versatility has been displayed here, and in all of them he has gained honours which he wears with a singular modesty."
A "J. B. Gilbert" was also listed in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.45) as being one of the better players in the Ruhleben Tennis Association. This may be a typo for J. D. Gilbert, or a separate person.
 
 
J. Gilchrist
 
J. Gilchrist is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Gilchrist was a merchant seaman on board the S. S. Castro, and interned in Barrack 22, A.
 
 
 
 

Alfred Henry Giles (Snr)
 
Alfred Henry Giles (Snr) is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Giles is recorded as having been born on June 6th 1872 in Worcester, and is described as having been a stableman prior to his internment. His home address was 2 Rue de Belgrade, Brussels. At the time the register was recorded, Giles was noted as staying in loft B, having been there since his transfer from Brussels on January 4th 1916. His two sons, Alfred and Eugene were also interned alongside him.
 
Between September 17th 1917 and September 24th, Giles spent some time being treated at the Schonungsbaracke.
 
 
Alfred Henry Giles (Jnr)
 
Alfred Henry Giles (Jnr) is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Giles is recorded as having been born on August 25th 1897 in Brussels, and is described as having been an electrician prior to his internment. His home address was 2 Rue de Belgrade, Brussels. At the time the register was recorded, Giles was noted as staying in loft B, having been there since his transfer from Brussels on January 4th 1916. His father, Alfred, and brother, Eugene, were also interned alongside him.
 
 
Eugene Giles
 
Eugene Giles is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Giles is recorded as having been born on October 17th 1898 in Underlecht, Belgium, and is described as having been a messenger prior to his internment. His home address was 2 Rue de Belgrade, Brussels. At the time the register was recorded, Giles was noted as staying in loft B, having been there since his transfer from Brussels on January 27th 1916. His father and brother, both called Alfred, were also interned alongside him.
 
 

Michael Gill
 
Michael Gill, of 67 Bowman Street, South Shields, was a member of the crew of the Glasgow steamer Bellailsa, which at the beginning of the war was berthed at Hamburg, where its crew was duly interned. They were held initially in large prison hulks for three weeks, before being relocated to Ruhleben.
 
When Gill was freed in May 1916, he gave a detailed interview to the Shields Daily Gazette, which was reprinted in the Scotsman newspaper of May 19th 1916. In the interview, Gill explained how bad conditions at Ruhleben had been, including the recollection that prioners were sometimes forced to go to their beds at the point of a revolver, in the early days in the camp before civilian rule ("Life at Ruhleben - Experiences of a Member of a Glasgow Crew", p.4).
 
Gill was also noted as being one of nine men over the age of 55 released from Ruhleben at the beginning of May 1916, in the Times of May 9th 1916 ("British Prisoners from Germany", p.5, col.F).
 
 
David Gillespie
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that David Gillespie was from Parkville, Grangemouth, and born in 1884 in Airth. he was a clerk, arrested in Bentheim on 28 AUG 1914 and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 

Gustav Ginsberg (1873-1919/20)
 
Gustav Ginsberg was a dentist interned in Ruhleben, and who after the war became the father of South African jazz pianist Felix De Cola. His great great nephew Adam Yamey provided the following information on Ginsberg in September 2007, for which I am indebted:
 
"Gustav Ginsberg, was a musician. His son recalled, many years later, that the internees were housed in converted stables and were treated reasonably there. At Rühleben, Gustav was very active in the camp orchestra.  Other very good musicians interned there including the pianist Max Pauer…  They played all the great piano concertos and put on performances of Gilbert and Sullivan in which men had to play the female roles, as there were no women in the camp. Music saved Gustav's sanity."
 
 
 

Walter A. Gladwin
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/64 regarding merchant seamen at Ruhleben, including information reporting conditions from Walter A. Gladwin of Hastings, a released civilian prisoner, sent via The Imperial Merchant Service Guild.
 
 
G. Glaiser
 
G. Glaiser was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 330 Hyde Road, Gorton.
 
 

Captain Caleb Glanfield
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/60 regarding Caleb Glanfield, of Cardiff, captain of the S.S. Rossall, a British subject interned at Ruhleben, and his intention to claim compensation for losses sustained.
 
Caleb was one of nine men released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Times of January 12th 1917 ("Nine Prisoners Released from Ruhleben", p.5, col. B).
 
 

Glasman
 
The National Archives in London holds records from 1915 at FO383/75 regarding Mrs. Glasman, of Islington, London, who, with her husband interned at Ruhleben, made a request for relief.
 
 

Fred Gluck
 
Fred Gluck contributed a drawing to the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.38) entitled "Whist Drive in a Loft", and a drawing to the third issue (May 1916, p.44) entitled "A Corner of Bond Street".
 
Gluck was thanked for his contributions to the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
 

Godfrey
 
In the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14), Godfrey is noted as having bowled well for Barrack 8 against Barrack 2, in a match played in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
 
Edward Stanley Godfrey
 
Possibly the Godfrey noted above, Edward Stanley Godfrey was noted in the National Archives MT9 records as having been released from Ruhleben on March 6th 1918. He was interned in Barrack 2. (Many thanks to Marcus Bateman).
 
This is likely the same Godfrey noted as having resided in Barrack 2 Box 24 on a postcard dated 4 MAR 1916, as held in photocopied form by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria (many thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 
 

William Stephen Goenner
 
William Stephen Goenner is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Goenner is recorded as having been born on January 11th 1888, and is described as having been a clerk prior to his internment. His home address was 105 Broenlow Road, Bowes Park, London, N. At the time the register was recorded, Goenner was noted as staying in R.2.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Goenner is noted as being from 105 Brownlow Road, Bowes Park, north London, and as having been born in London in 1888. He worked as a correspondent in Cologne, where he was arrested on 4 SEP 1914. After a brief period held in Cologne he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 
Asher Gold
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Asher Gold is noted as being from Severn Hotel, Margate, Kent. He was arrested in Breslau on 6 NOV 1914, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 

G. P. Golding
 
G. P. Golding, of South Shields, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

Joseph Goldman
 
Joseph Goldman was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
He was also recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 85 Elizabeth Street, Cheetham, M/c.
 
Goldman was later noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

Harold Golland
 
Harold Golland is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Golland is recorded as having been born on June 20th 1879 in Salford, and is described as having been a teacher prior to his internment. His home address was 2 Mostyn Avenue, Wembley Hill, London, N.W. At the time the register was recorded, Golland was noted as staying in box 1, having been there since his transfer from the Tea House on April 19th 1915. he later made his way to Holland on March 22nd 1918.
 
He was also recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 2 Mostyn Avenue, Wembley Hill, London, N.W.
 
 

W. Gollop
 
W. Gollop, of Bristol, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

Walter P. Goodale
 
Walter P. Goodale was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
 
The National Archived contains records from 1915 at FO383/77 regarding clothing for W. P. Goodale, a British civilian prisoner of war interned in Ruhleben.
 
 

Goodchild
 
Goodchild is noted in the first issue of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.8) as having appeared in the play "The Great Adventurer" in the camp.
 
Goodchild is further listed in the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.43) as having exhibted in the camp's third art exhibition.
 
 

Harold Goodhind
 
Harold Goodhind was noted in the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.8) as having appeared in the 1915 Christmas pantomime in the camp.

Goodhind was also noted in the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.32) as having produced the play "Le Controller des Wagons-Lits".

On April 23rd, 24th and 25th, 1916, Goodind played the part of Olivia in the production of Shakespeare's "As You Like It", as noted in the Scotsman newspaper of May 15th 1916 ("Shakespeare Celebrations in Ruhleben", p.7).

Goodhind was thanked in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.37) for his contribution to the theatre during 1916.
 
He was again noted in the sixth issue (June 1917) as having produced a play in the camp entitled "The Marriage of Kitty".
 
 

Thomas Gooding
 
The National Archives hold records from 1915 at FO383/74 regarding Thomas Gooding, recently released from Ruhleben, and now at Davos, Switzerland. The records contain an application for assistance out of public funds.
 
 
W. Gooding
 
W. Gooding is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Gooding was a merchant seaman on board the Coralie Horlock, and interned in Barrack 9, box 26.
 
 

James Goodman
 
James Goodman is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Goodman is recorded as having been born on April 20th 1897 in Altona, and is described as having been an apprentice prior to his internment. His home address was 19 Goebenstrasse, Altona. At the time the register was recorded, Goodman was noted as staying in loft B, having been there since transferring from Barrack 12 on April 25th 1918.
 
 
John William Goodman
 
John William Goodman was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 12. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 
Ernest Goodrick
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Ernest Goodrick is noted as being a groom from 3 Blackford Cottages, Roehampton. He was arrested at Pohnstorf, Mecklenburg, on 8 NOV 1914 and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 

C. Goodwell
 
C. Goodwell advertised in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.16):
Haircutting and shaving saloon, Bar 2. Proprietor: C. Goodwell
 
Charles W. Goodwell
 
From a photo of a National Archives file from collection MT9, supplied by Marcus Bateman in March 2007, it is known that on November 30th 1916, Charles W. Goodwell (of Barrack 18) was sent to the Stadtvogtei prison in Berlin from the camp. (Camp Changes, Supplement 10). Many thanks to Marcus.  It is not known if this is the same C. Goodwell listed above.
 
 

P. E. Goole
 
P. E. Golle, of Brightlingsea, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 
Ron Goole
 
Ron Goole was noted as having resided in Barrack 5 on a postcard to London dated 23 DEC 1915, as held in a private collection by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria. (Many thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

Gordon
 
Gordon is recorded in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for Barrack 2 in the Ruhleben Cricket League of 1915. He is noted as having bowled well for his team.
 
 
D. P. Gordon
 
D. P. Gordon was photographed as a part of the Ruhleben Parcel Post - see Alfred Hazell King's entry for the image.
 
 
M. J. Gordon
 
M. J. Gordon was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 40 Christchurch Avenue, Brondesbury, London, N.W.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Gordon seems to be the man recorded as M. Gordon, a merchant from London N.W, arrested in Frankfurt on 6 NOV 1914 and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 

Jakob Gostynski
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/65 regarding Mrs Bertha Gostynski, just returned from Germany after her husband, Jakob Gostynski, a British subject, was interned in Ruhleben. The papers include a request from her brother, B. Horowitz of Hackney, for relief for her and her children, and the request's subsequent referral to the Jewish Board of Guardians.
 
 
Arthur E. Gottenberg
 
Arthur E. Gottenberg was recorded as being in Barrack 13 Box 19 on a postcard to fellow internee Henry Beerenson in Barrack 6, Box 5, now held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber). 
 
 

Walter Gouda
 
Walter Gouda was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding Walter Gouda, a British subject interned in Ruhleben at the outbreak of the war when acting as the continental manager for the Rossia Insurance Company in Berlin.
 
 
Hugh Goudie
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Hugh Goudie was noted as being from 18 Elaine Street, Liverpool, and as having been born in Seacombe in 1876. He worked as a seaman and was arrested in Hamburg on 1 AUG 1914, and after being imprisoned on hulks was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 7. 
 
 

Percy E. Gould
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Percy Gould was noted as being from 34 Spring Road, Brightlingsea, and as having been born in Brightlingsea in 1891. He worked as a mariner and was arrested in Hamburg on 16 OCT 1914. After a brief spell imprisoned on the hulks in Hamburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 8.
 
Gould was again noted as playing for the Barrack 8 football team against Barrack 20 in the RFA cup final in April 1917, in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917). The first match was a draw, 1-1. In the replay, three days later, Barrack 8 lost, 3-0.
 
Marcus Bateman notes from the TNA files in MT9/1238 that P. E. Gould was second officer on the Campeador, but states his residence was 24 Spring Road as opposed to 34. Another slight discrepancy is in the year of birth, which is stated to be 1884 rather than 1891.
 
 

Gould
 
Gould is recorded in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for Barrack 2 in the Ruhleben Cricket League of 1915. He is noted as having bowled well for his team. He may be the same Gould as noted in Barrack 8 in 1917 (see above).
 
 

George Gould
 
George Gould is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Gould is recorded as having been born on July 17th 1876 in Bollington, Cheshire, and is described as having been a pipe fitter prior to his internment. His home address was Kerridge, Macclesfield. At the time the register was recorded, Gould was noted as staying in loft B.
 
George was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as above.
 
 

Isaac Gourvitch
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Isaac Gourvitch is noted as being a teacher from 181 Cannon Street Road, London E. He was arrested in Bad Homburg on 6 NOV 1914 and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
I. Gourvitch was later noted in The Times of February 28th 1919 as being a past student of University College, London, and an inmate at Ruhleben during the war. It was noted that he would be giving a public lecture at the college on Monday, March 17th 1919 at 5.30pm entitled "Four Years' Internment in Ruhleben Camp and other Experiences in Germany" ("News in Brief", p.7, col. G).
 
 

T. Govett
 
T. Govett was a prisoner who was thanked for articles written for the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
Govett also had the honour to be lampooned by way of a monogram drawn in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), by artist CMAW.
 
 
Gowtend (?)
 
Gowtend (?) was noted in 'Le Controleur' dated 1 MAR 1916 as being in Barrack 11, a copy of which is held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 
G. Graburn
 
G. Graburn is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Graburn was a merchant seaman on board the Euclid, and interned in Barrack 17.
 
 
G. Graham
 
Dr. Horst Pöethe, president of the Herrigsche Gesselschaft (Germany's oldest literary society), contacted me in May 2008 to say that he had found many books in second hand stores in Berlin which had previously been part of the Ruhleben Camp Library. Inside the covers of some of these books were names of former prisoners, which he has kindly forwarded to me. The following is the signature of G. Graham, of Box 10, Barrack 13:

Gilbert B. Graham
 
Gilbert B. Graham was born in 1886 and died in 1964. He was interned in Ruhleben, as noted from catalogue entry 3DRL/6545(A) at the Australian War Memorial website. Further AWM entries can be found at 3DRL/4149, P04434.001, and PR91/048 (which states he was released in 1918 on an invalid exchange).
 
An image of Graham can be seen at the website by clicking on the following link: Gilbert Graham.
 
With thanks to Joanne Smedley, curator of the Australian War Memorial photographs section.
 
 
Robert Graham
 
Many thanks to Marc Stuart for the following contribution in March 2008 via this site's guestbook:
My great x2 grandfather, Robert Graham, was interned at Ruhleben. He was a fireman on the ship S.S. Juno that happened to be in Hamburg at the wrong time of 1914.
Robert is confirmed on Marcus Bateman's website at http://wanborough.ukuhost.co.uk/POW/POW.htm as being a fireman on the Juno, born in Northumberland, and as being resident at St Tams House City Road, Newcastle-on-Tyne. He was released from Ruhleben on 7 JAN 1918.
 
 

Grainger
 
A Grainger or Gringer is listed as being at Ruhleben in a Foreign Office file in FO 369/710 dated 11 OCT 1914. The list was communicated to the Foreign Office by a Nurse Coe. Beside the two names is noted c/o Miss Stanhope-Jones, 87 Cadogan Gardens, Sloan Square, S10 (with thanks to Simon Fowler).
 
 
Robert L. Grant
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Robert L. Grant was noted as being from Woodlands, Bridge Road, Epsom, and as having been born in London in 1896. He was arrested in Bielefeld on 16 OCT 1914. He was confined initially in Bielefeld and then sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 8.

 

Gray
 
Gray was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Scotsman newspaper on January 31st 1917 ("British Civilians From Ruhleben", p.6).
 
 

Stanley Ignatius Willard Gray
 
Stanley Ignatius Willard Gray is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Gray is recorded as having been born on November 16th 1896 in Cambridge, and is described as having been a student prior to his internment. His home address was Lestrange Arms Hotel, Hunstanton, Norfolk. At the time the register was recorded, Gray was noted as staying in R.1, and as later moving to Barrack 2 on April 25th 1918.
 
Gray is also recorded as having spent some time in the Lazarett between April 4th 1918 and April 16th.
 
 
Greaves
 
Greaves is listed as being at Ruhleben in a Foreign Office file in FO 369/710 dated 11 OCT 1914 (with thanks to Simon Fowler). There is a question mark in red beside this, however, so it is not confirmed that he was there. The list was communicated to the Foreign Office by a Nurse Coe.
 

Harry Greayer
 
Harry Greayer is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Greayer is recorded as having been born on May 14th 1879 in Hamburg, and is described as having been an export merchant prior to his internment. His home address was 5 Oderfelderstrasse, Hamburg. At the time the register was recorded, Greayer was noted as staying in box 2, having been there since transferring from Barrack 1 on June 21st 1918.
 
 

William Greayer
 
William Greayer is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Greayer is recorded as having been born on January 26th 1878 in Hamburg, and is described as having been a drug broker prior to his internment. His home address was 31 Hagedornstrasse, Hamburg. At the time the register was recorded, Greayer was noted as staying in box 21, having been there since transferring from Barrack 10 on April 25th 1918.
 
 
Green
 
In a list of prisoners from the Wolf transferred to Ruhleben in A. H. F. Clarke's "To Kiel on the German Raider Wolf and Beyond", Green is noted as a Ruhleben prisoner, captured on the ship Matunga in early 1918. See entry for Alfred Henry Frank Clarke.
 
 

J. Green
 
J. Green was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 
 
John Green (senior)
 
John Green was the great grandfather of Jennifer O' Connor, who kindly supplied the following information in August 2007:
 
"My great grandfather and grandfather (aged 17yrs) were interned in 
Ruhleben after spending some time on the hulks in Hamburg. I have an account written by my great grandfather of his capture from the 
trawler St Cuthbert in the first few days of the war. Sadly there is 
no account of his time in the camp although I do know that my 
grandfather worked in the cookhouse and got into trouble for giving 
his father extra rations. I also have a few postcard pictures of the 
camp, the snow model made by the prisoners and the crosses made for those who died in the camp."
 
John Green was in fact the skipper of the St. Cuthbert, and at the time of his capture, his home address was noted as 206 Barcroft Street, Grimsby. He was born in 1867.
 
 
 
 
John Green (junior) 
 
This John Green was the grandfather of Jennifer O' Connor, and son of the previously noted John green, skipper of the St Cuthbert. He was a deck hand on his father's ship, and was aged 18 when captured. His home address was registered as 128 Rutland Street, Grimsby.
 
 
 
 

Owen Green
 
Owen Green is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Green is recorded as having been born on November 3rd 1892 in Walthamstow, and is described as having been a correspondent prior to his internment. His home address was 41 Myddleton Road, Bowes Park, N. At the time the register was recorded, Green was noted as staying in loft B, having been there since transferring from Barrack 23 on September 15th 1915. Green was moved to Lazarett on August 9th, where he eventually died, on September 8th 1917.
 
 
Percy Green
 
Percy Green was interned, at least in part, in Barrack 4, box 12, as noted from a receipt in the possession of David Springbett. The date of the receipt is December 13th 1915. Many thanks to David for sharing this information in February 2007.
 
 
P. B. Green
 
P. B. Green was third engineer on the Campeador and was 21 when interned in Ruhleben. His home address was listed as 70 Vandyke Street, Liverpool. (Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.)
 
As 'P. P. Green' he was also recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 70 Van Dyke Street, Sefton Park, Liverpool.
 
 

D. H. Greene
 
D. H. Greene was photographed as a part of the Ruhleben Parcel Post - see Alfred Hazell King's entry for the image.
 
 
D. K. Greene

dkgreenediplomacy1918.jpg

In the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.8), Greene is listed as having performed in the Irish Players' rendition of the play "John Bull's Other Island".
 
In the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.32), Greene is listed as having appeared in the play "The Younger Generation".
 
In June 1918, Greene was photographed in his role as "Dora" in the Ruhleben Theatre production of "Diplomacy". See right.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

E. B. Greenfield

christmascard1916.jpg

A Ruhleben Christmas postcard was sent by E. B. Greenfield in 1916 to a Mrs P. F. Bosists in "The Lean-Ho", Annanford, South Wales. The card tells us that Greenfield was in Barrack 11's loft. The front of the postcard depicts two prisoners looking longingly through the wire fence towards the rising sun, which has the words 1917 written across it. Beneath the picture are the words "Best Wishes From Ruhleben, Christmas 1916".
 
 

W. Greenhough
 
W. Greenhough was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 

Greenwood
 
Greenwood was noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (1915, p.22) as being one of the backs of the Irish rugby team, in a series of friendly internationals in the camp.
 
 

Greenwood
 
The son of Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Greenwood was recorded in the Times of January 1st 1916 as being a prisoner at Ruhleben ("Prayers in Cipher", p.5, col E). The article primarily concerns the recorded suicide of Greenwood's father and also mentions the death of his brother, Lieutenant Greenwood, in France (in fact Lt. John Francis Bernal Greenwood, died at St. Julien, near Ypres, on May 2nd 1915, aged 30).
 
 
H. Greenwood
 
This Greenwood was photographed as a member of the Ruhleben Parcel Post team - see entry for Alfred Hazell King for the photo. Possibly one of the above two entries.
 
 
H. Greoyer
 
H. Greoyer was noted as being in Barrack 10 Box 15 on a postcard dated 21 MAR 1916, now held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria (with thansk to Dr. Heber).
 
 

Joseph Gresty
 
Joseph Gresty is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Gresty is recorded as having been born on February 21st 1877 in Oldham, and is described as having been a cloth finisher prior to his internment. His home address was 41 Corinth Street, Harpurkey, Manchester. At the time the register was recorded, Gresty was noted as staying in Loft A.
 
Gresty is also recorded as having spent some time in the Schoningsbaracke between February 23rd 1918 and February 28th.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Gresty is noted as being from 41 Corinth Street, Hapurhey, Manchester, and as having been born in Oldham in 1879. He worked as a textile finisher in Cologne, where he was arrested on 5 AUG 1914. After a brief period held in Cologne he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
He is also recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 33 Slack Road, Blackley, M/c.
 
In April 2007, the great granddaughter of fellow internee John Robert Schofield, Patty Schofield, contacted me. In addition to her great grandfather, she also provided further info on Gresty:
Another Ruhleben survivor mentioned on your website, Joseph Gresty, worked with John Robert Schofield and I believe lived near, or possibly in the same building as the Schofields in Cologne. After the war, both men left England in 1921 with their entire families and relocated in Rhode Island. John Schofield became superintendant of the Arkwright Finishing Company, a textile mill owned by the Interlaken Company. I believe the English branch was known as Winterbottom, the German branch as Peterworks and it was Interlaken over here but I have yet to verify this information. My father (also John Robert) and my uncle Raymond used to play in the Arkwright mill, (Kent County, W.Warwick - I think this was the town - Rhode Island) with Gresty's children.  The Ellis Island website has a record of their journey. They departed from Liverpool 10 Sept 1921 on the SS Baltic arriving in New York 19 Sept.1921.
Many thanks to Patty for her contribution.
 
 

Sir Edward Grey
 
Sir Edward Grey was an inmate at Ruhleben, as noted by Francis Gribble in his essay entitled "Leaves From a Ruhleben Notebook".
"They marched us down on to the racecourse for the purpose (roll call), and there sorted us alphabetically - all the A's together, all the B's together, &c. It was a tedious business, lasting for several hours, and only enlivened by the merriment which the sound of some of the names provoked - such names as those of Mr. Kitchener, who was a tailor, and Mr. Edward Grey, of whom I know nothing except that he was not a Secretary of State."
 
 

Francis Gribble
 
Francis Gribble was an inmate at Barrack 5 in Ruhleben. He wrote a short essay entitled "Leaves From a Ruhleben Notebook" outlining his experiences whilst interned, including the witnessing of a fellow inmate's suicide. This was advertised as being printed within "The Fortnightly Review" of January 1916, the advert appearing in the Times of January 3rd 1916 (p.4, col.B).
 
Articles in the Scotsman newspaper of December 3rd 1915 (p.6) and December 4th 1915 (p.11) outline some of Gribble's observations whilst in Ruhleben for an article for Nineteenth Century magazine, entitled Germany Seen from an Internment Camp".
 
Documents from 1915 concerning Gribble are held at the National Archives in London, at FO383/26 and at FO383/27, including an enquiry from his wife, Eva Gribble, in Holland, regarding his possible inclusion in an exchange of invalided civilians in the camp.
 
Gribble was released pre-1917 and was further noted in Times of February 17th 1917 as preparing to take part in a demonstration of relatives and friends of the Ruhleben interned at Kingsway Hall on February 26th (p.11, col. G). A summary of the meeting was later carried in the paper on February 27th 1917 ("British Prisoners in Germany", p.5, col. B).
 
On November 28th 1919, the Times carried an advert for Gribble's book, "The History of Ruhleben", co-written with Joseph Powell (p.18, col. A).
 
A further book, "Seen in Passing", also including a vivid description of Gribble's time at Ruhleben, was advertised for sale in The Times on January 4th 1929 (p. 10, col. A).
 
Gribble's obituary, as carried in The Times of October 4th 1946, records that he had been interned in Ruhleben as aresult of having been arrested in Luxembourg, where he had been on holiday in 1914 ("Mr. Francis Gribble", p.7, col. E).
 
 
Robert Grieve
 
Robert Grieve was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. He was described as a 24 year old waiter previously at work in Berlin.
 
 

Fritz Grif
 
In the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915), Fritz Grif is noted on page 12 as preparing a performance of the German opera "Der Graf von Luxembourg", for the middle of July.
 
 
Barney Griffin
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Barney Griffin was a second captain from the Seaman's Mission, Posterngate, and born in Tuam, Galway, in 1881. He was an engineer on trawlers, and arrested in hamburg on 16 OCT 1914, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 
Edward Griffin
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Edward Griffin is noted as being from Trampton on Severn, Gloucester, and as having been born in Blakeney in 1894. He was a seaman, and was arrested on 15 AUG 1914 in Hamburg, and after a brief imprisonment on the hulks he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 4.
 
 
J. Griffin
 
J. Griffin is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Griffin was a merchant seaman on board the Oswestry, and interned in Barrack 3, loft A.
 
 

George Harold Griffith
 
George Harold Griffith is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Griffith is recorded as having been born on August 17th 1877 in London, and is described as having been a factory owner prior to his internment. His home address was 20 Grobelstr., Dresden. At the time the register was recorded, Griffith was noted as staying in box 12, having been there since being brought from Dresden on June 1st 1915.
 
 

T. P. Griffith
 
T. P. Griffith, of Seacombe, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 
G. Griffiths
 
G. Griffiths was photographed as a member of the Ruhleben Parcel Post team - see entry for Alfred Hazell King for the photo.
 
 

Samuel John "Jack" Griggs   (18/3/1897 - 21/5/1972)
 

The following biographical entry on Jack was written by his daughter, Elizabeth Beasley, in January 2006, specifically for this site. Elizabeth, is currently writing an account of his life at Ruhleben for the family and would love to hear from anyone who can add to his story. She can be contacted at airsporter@virgin.net. Many thanks Elizabeth!
 
In April 1914, shortly after his 17th birthday, Jack Griggs left London to stay with a German professor in Leipzig to study the language. His first arrest was on 5 September when a policeman called at the house at 6am. After an interview at the police station, and the confiscation of his passport, he was taken to the local prison where he spent a total of two and a half weeks. The first three days were in solitary confinement, then he was joined by another future Ruhlebenite, David Percival Doak.
 
Less than a fortnight after his release, Jack was rearrested. This time he was sent to Leipzig's Arbeitsanstalt along with several other British civilians. After ten days here they were marched to the railway station, herded into goods waggons, and transferred to the Stadtvogtei prison in Berlin. On 6 November Jack was sent to Ruhleben where he would stay until leaving on the last train out on 24 November 1918.
 
Most of his time at Ruhleben was spent in Barrack 7, Box 8. As the Camp thinned out in the last months of the war, he moved to Barrack 11, Box 3, then to Barrack 11, Box 8. Whilst imprisoned Jack continued his language studies in French and German, and also went to classes in Russian, Dutch, Spanish, carpentry and horticulture - subjects he would not have studied back home. Once a recognised exam centre was established at Ruhleben he gained certificates for French, German and Russian from the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. Jack also enjoyed many Camp activities, especially the thetare and concerts. He joined the Tennis Club and keep-fit class and was a keen spectator at the fottball and cricket matches. In retrospect, Jack regarded his time at Ruhleben as an education in itself as he had the opportunity to meet so many different people from all walks of life.
 
Jack celebrated his 21st birthday in the Camp on 19 March 1918 with a small party in his stable. Various friends supplied goodies from their food parcels and someone even provided a bottle of whisky! Among his presents was a ratskin bound copy of Balzac's "Eugenie Grandet" from his great friend and fellow inmate Frank Clifford Milner.
 
In the 1920s and 30s Jack worked for his grandfather's business, bristle importer and brush manufacturer Samuel Toye. He was also able to travel extensively in Europe, North Africa and South America.
 
In 1942 he married Betty Shaw. They had 3 children: Elizabeth, Christine and John.
 
During the Second World War Jack was able to put his fluent German to good use when he worked for Naval Intelligence when he interrogated German POWs and translated the V2 plans smuggled out of Peenemunde. He was present at Luneburg Heath on 4 May 1945 as Navy interpreter when Admiral Donitz signed the surrender. He also saw Belsen shortly after it was liberated. In the following three years Jack made several more visits to Germany. having been invited to take the rank of Colonel in the Control Commission, he went to Leipzig and Hamburg. Another trip was at the request of AV Alexander, First Lord of the Admiralty, as his personal interpreter. Jack also translated at the War Trials.

Jack Griggs (standing) 21st birthday in Ruhleben - courtesy Elizabeth Beasley

 
 
Stanley A. Grimm
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding the possible release of Stanley Grimm, interned in Ruhleben, on medical grounds.
 
After the war, Grimm was also recorded at the Ruhleben Exhibition on the day that the Crown Princess of Sweden visited. The article appeared on January 30th 1919 in the Times ("Ruhleben Exhibition", p.11, col. F):
... the name of Mr. Grimm is less familiar. He is an interesting artist, brought up in Russia, and a student of French and Italian art. His forcible sketches of Ruhleben groups and surroundings remind one now of Steinlen, now of Forain, but always French influence is overlaid with Russian feeling, and at the same time Mr. Grimm shows an individual outlook in choice no less than treatment of a subject.
The Times of February 5th 1919 also tells us that the princess returned on February 4th to the exhibition, and purchased 40 paintings, with the painters selected including Grimm ("Court News", p.11, col. B).
 
Grimm's sketches were later used to illustrate the book "In Ruhleben: Letters from a Prisoner".
 
 

David Henry Grimshaw
 
David Henry Grimshaw is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Grimshaw is recorded as having been born on December 22nd 1868 in Leeds, and is described as having been a foundry engineer prior to his internment. His home address was c/o Mrs Bailey, Oban Villas, Wetherby, Yorkshire. At the time the register was recorded, Grimshaw was noted as staying in box 27, having been there since transferring from Tuchel on April 21st 1918. On May 13th 1918 he moved from Barrack 5 to the Tea House.
 
 
O. Groenings
 
O. Groenings was named in an article in the Manchester Guardian of Auguist 19th 1915 (p.6) as having participated in a Lincolnshire versus Yorkshire cricket match at Ruhleben. The piece mentions that he was playing for Yorkshire, and that he was well known in athletic circles as the world's hurdle jumping record holder.
 
 

Stanley H. Gudgeon
 
19 year old Ruhleben inmate Stanley H. Gudgeon was noted in The Times of August 11th 1915 as being the brother of Captain F. G. Gudgeon, and of G. F. C. Gudgeon ("Personal Notes" p.5. col. F).
 
Gudgeon was noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for the Varsities team against the Rest of Ruhleben, in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
Gudgeon was further noted in the same issue (p.22) as being an injured English player during a series of friendly rugby internationals in the camp.
 
A postcard written by Gudgeon was recorded for sale on E-Bay in February 2006. The card was addressed to Gustavus Gudgeon, Esq, c/o George E. Magan Esq, 59 Wall Street, New York. The card was dated December 19th 1916 and states that Gudegon was interned in Barrack 3, box 16. A picture of the message side of the card was not depicted in the sale information.
 
 

R. Gumbrell
 
R. Gumbrell, of London, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

Gummery
 
Gummery was noted in the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.38) as having been elected to the Sports Committee to represent the interests of the Ruhleben Golf Committee.
 
 
Gurcke (?)
 
Gurcke (?) is noted as being in Barrack 8 on a receipt dated 20 NOV 1915, as held now by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

Max Gusofsky
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding Max Gusofsky, a Jewish operatic and dramatic artist, who was detained as an invalided civilian in Ruhleben. The documents relate specifically to an enquiry from his wife, Mrs. Ray Gusofsky, of Mile End, London.
 
 

William Guthrie
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that William Guthrie was resident at Kasernenstrasse 7, Harburg, was born in Harburg on 9 SEP 1895, was a student arrested in Harburg on 6 NOV 1914, and after a brief period of confinement in Harburg was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 1.
 
William Guthrie is later listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Guthrie is again recorded as having been born on September 9th 1895 in Harburg, Germany, and is described as having been a student prior to his internment. His home address was Kasernenstr., Harburg. At the time the register was recorded, Guthrie was noted as staying in loft A, having been there since transferring from Barrack 23 on September 15th 1915.
 
 
Andrew Guyan
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Andrew Guyan was from Aberdeen, Scotland, and was  North Sea fisherman born 17 OCT 1888. He was arrested in Hamburg, after which he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 4.
 
 

Guzsofsky
 
Guzsofsky was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
NB: This may be Max Gusofsky, noted above.
 
 

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H
 
 
V. Haag
 
The National Archives in London hold records from 1915 at FO383/70 regarding V. Haag, a British subject in Ruhleben, on the subject of his transfer from Ruhleben to Stadtvogtei prison, Berlin.
 
 
Sidney J. Hahlo
 
Sidney J. Hahlo was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as c/o G. P. Haworth, 19 Chapel Walks, Manchester.
 
 

Edward J. Hales
 
The Liddel Collection at Leeds University holds several items relating to Ruhleben inmate Edward J. hales, donated by him in July 1977 and May 1978, and which can be accessed at RUH 25. These items are: Christmas Carol sheets from 1915; a photograph of Bishop Bury from December 1916; a manuscript receipt for 20 Marks from German authorities on Novmeber 20th 1914; a letter from J. N. Sidney, dated April 16th 1916; three letters from his mother (dated 25/11/1917, 23/5/1918, and 31/3/1918); a manuscript balance sheet for Barrack 3, dated November 11th 1918; two account books from July 1916 to November 1918); four editions of 'The Ruhleben Camp Magazine' (Dec 1915, Apr 1916, May 1916, Aug 1916); eight editions of 'In Ruhleben Camp' (June 6th 1915, July 11th 1915, August 1st 1915, August 15th 1915, August 29th 1915, September 12th 1915, September 26th 1915, October 10th 1915); and a typed transcript of an interview recorded with Peter Liddle in April 1978. The online index also tells us Hales was born in 1890 in Wolverhampton and educated at Birmingham University. Whilst on holiday in Germany at the outbreak of the war, he was arrested and interned for the duration in Barrack 3.
 
 

Frederick Hall
 
Frederick Hall was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 20. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 
George Hall
 
The following information on Ruhleben inmate George Hall was submitted by his granddaughter, Gail Hall, on June 1st 2006, for which I am extremely grateful.

georgehallinruhleben1917.jpg

George Hall was born in Chilwell, Nottingham 1885, one of many children of a saw mill owner and timber merchant. He attended Nottingham High School (1896-1901), and was in the same class as D. H. Lawrence, beating him in the July 1899 summer exams coming 9th to Lawrence's 16th out of 24!
Aged 30 years old, George was working in Germany when war was declared, and was duly arrested and then interned in Ruhleben. 
 
His mother, Sarah Hall, by now a wealthy widow, waged a fierce campaign to get him released.  This backfired, because important people became interested, leading the Germans to think that George himself must have been equally important. He was soon moved to Spandau prison, until they could get to the bottom of his real identity, but when they twigged that he was just good old George Hall, he was soon sent back to Ruhleben!
 
George was also a keen artist, and sketched many of his fellow inmates whilst he was interned in the camp, as well as drawing a portrait of himself.
 
George returned to Great Britain after the war and became the manager of the Empire Hotel in Llandudno, owned by his mother. He soon met a lady called Nesta, only daughter of William Simon and Marie Williams, prominent drapers in the town, and married in 1922. After the wedding, the couple travelled to Australia for two years, before returning in 1925. Back in Wales, they bought the Golden Lion Royal Hotel in Dolgellau, Merioneth, and soon added the Gwernan Lake Hotel, The Bontddu Hall Hotel and a large farm on Cader Idris called Tyddyn Mawr. 
George and Nesta had four sons - John, who later bought The George III, Penmaenpool; Bill, who bought The Bontddu Hall from his father; Peter, who ran The Gwernan Lake; and Gilbert, who ran The Golden Lion Royal. They also had a single daughter, Noreen.
 
George Hall died in 1951 in his home in Bontddu.

hallselfportrait.jpg

From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Hall is noted as being from Llandudno in North Wales, and as having been born in Nottingham on 14 SEP 1894. He was a lace salesman, and was arrested in Plauen, Saxony, on 6 NOV 1914. After a brief imprisonment in Plauen and Berlin, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 4.
 
Hall was further noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the losing Brearley's XI side against Cameron's XI on October 7th 1916. The score was 4-2 to the Cameron team. He was later a member of the Barrack 9 Divison II cricket team which won the knock out competition of 1917.
 
 

J. Hall
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/38 concerning the property of J. Hall, of the S.S. Winterton, interned at Ruhleben.
 
 
R. H. Hall
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, R. H. Hall was noted as being from 21 North Furzeham Lane, Brixham, and as having been born in Brixham in 1892. He was arrested in Bremen on 6 AUG 1914, and after being imprisoned on hulks was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 7.
 
 
Sidney Hall
 
Sidney Hall was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 2. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

C. A. Hallam
 
C. A. Hallam was appointed in March 1915 by Powell, the camp captain at Ruhleben, to chair the Watch and Works Department, as reported by the Scotsman on 29/3/1915 and the Times on 29/3/1915 ("More and Better Food at Ruhleben" p.4 col A). The department's remit was to take control of the camp's police, the maintenance of order in the camp, and the control of the hot water boilers, barbers, cobblers and petty tradesmen.
 
The seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp carried the following announcement (Sep 1915, p.26):
Mr P. F. W. Simon has been appointed Captain of Barrack No. 7 in the place of Mr C. A. Hallam who has retired from the post. Our thanks go to Mr. Hallam for his valuable services in the interests of the Camp.
Hallam is further noted in the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.32) as having co-written the play "Jimmie's Last Crime", with fellow writer Mr. Crossland, which was performed on March 23rd 1916.
 
 

J. Halliday
 
J. Halliday was an Edinburgh University man who was interned in Ruhleben after the outbreak of war. The Scotsman newspaper on 1/1/1915 (p.8) recorded the text of the following postcard sent to Edinburgh University:
"Best greetings to the old 'Varsity from the following students and ex-students at present resident at Ruhleben - James L. Mounsey; H. J. W. Tillyard, lecturer in Greek; W. J. Crosland Briggs, M.A., 1914; Harold Luck, M.A., 1913; M. F. Liddle, M.A., 1909; J. Halliday, M.A., 1914; James Peebles Conn, Bucher scholar in music, 1902; J. M. Dickson, M.A., BSc., Agric.; R. Herdman Pender, M.A., teacher in George Heriot's School; E. G. Burgoyne, J. Fleming, 1895-97; Robert McNeil, 1905-6; Eric G. Riddell, 1908-9, former students."
 
 

George Hallison
 
George Hallison is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hallison is recorded as having been born on May 4th 1894 in London, and is described as having been a merchant prior to his internment. His home address was 5 Sk., Wutow, Wladiwostok. At the time the register was recorded, Hallison was noted as staying in box 6, having been there since arriving from Hanover on July 29th 1917. On August 19th 1918 the register tells us that Hallison escaped from Ruhleben.
 
 

C. Hamlin (senr)
 
C. Hamlin (senr) was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 45 Edmund Street, Seedley, Manchester.
 
Hamlin was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 
C. Hamlin (junr)
 
C. Hamlin (junr) was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 45 Edmund Street, Seedley, Manchester.
 
 

H. F. Hamlyn

irc3hfhamlyn.jpg

In the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.19), Hamlyn was noted as being a member of the Ruhleben Dramatic Society. On page 36, he is reviewed for his role in the production in the camp of Arthur Conan Doyles "The Speckled Band", produced by fellow inmate Reynolds. The review of his part stated:
"Mr. Hamlyn's fussy old grocer calls for special mention".
Hamlyn was also sketched as he appeared in the role for the third issue of In Ruhleben Camp (July 1915, p.19).
 
 
 
 
 
S. Hammer
 
S. Hammer was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 1 Tyne Street, Liverpool.
 
 

George Hammond
 
George Hammond was listed in The Times of January 8th 1916 ("Released Civilians" p.5, col. D) as one of 69 men released from Ruhleben on Thursday, January 6th, 1916, who subsequently travelled to Flushing for their return trip to England.
 
 

Cuthbert Oswald Harman Hamshaw
 
Cuthbert Oswald Harman Hamshaw is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hamshaw is recorded as having been born May 22nd 1893 in Little Bowden, Leicester, and is described as having been a jockey prior to his internment. His home address was Exning, Newmarket. At the time the register was recorded, Hamshaw was noted as staying in box 2.
 
Between September 26th 1917 and September 29th, Hamshaw spent some time being treated at the Schonungsbaracke, and then between October 15th 1917 and December 8th, Hamshaw spent some time being treated at the Lazarett. He is later recorded as having moved to Barrack 2 on December 10th 1917.
 
 

Benjamin Hancox
 
Benjamin Hancox was one of five men released from Ruhleben in September 1916, who were hospitably cared for by the Society of Freinds, as reported in the Times of October 7th 1916 ("Back From Germany", p.7, col. E).
 
 

Frank Hanneman
 
Frank Hanneman is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hanneman is recorded as having been born on April 23rd 1895 in Grimsby, and is described as having been a fisherman on the "Chamelion" prior to his internment. His home address was55 Rutland Street, Grimsby. At the time the register was recorded, Hanneman was noted as staying in loft B, having transferred there from Senne on October 29th 1915.
 
 

S. Hanner
 
S. Hanner was recorded in the Times of July 8th 1916 ("Back from Germany", p.7, col.A) as arriving at Gravesend on July 7th 1916, having been released from Ruhleben.
 
 

Hanson
 
The National Archives in London holds documents from 1915 at FO383/69 regarding conditions at Ruhleben, including an interview with a Mr. Hanson, recently released as an invalid, and a report from New Scotland Yard.
 
 
Arthur Hanson
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Arthur Hanson is noted as being from 43 Helix Road, Brixton Hill, London. He was a correspondent arrested in Brussels on 30 JAN 1915, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 

Arthur Reginald Hanson
 
Arthur Reginald Hanson is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hanson is recorded as having been born on February 11th 1892 in Sydney, and is described as having been an engineer on the "Chamelion" prior to his internment. His home address was Drummoine, Sydney, NSW. At the time the register was recorded, Hanson was noted as staying in loft A.
 
 

Frederick William Hanson
 
The Scotsman newspaper of December 28th 1915 contains a letter from Frederick William Hanson after his release from Ruhleben, describing the circumstances of his arrest, period in Ruhleben, and subsequent release ("Acts of Retaliation - Merchant's Experience". p.8). Hanson had been arrested in Hamburg, where he had been working for London firm William F. Malcolm and Co. since 1897, and was interned in the camp on November 6th 1914, at the age of 54.
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding both H. W. Hopf and F. W. Hanson, detained in Germany, including a note from Hopf's wife in Rugby, and from the High Commissioner for the Union of South Africa, regarding their possible exchange. FO383/69 also holds a report from Frederick W. Hanson regarding the release of certain persons alleged to be of pro-German sympathies.
 
The Times of January 24th 1916 carried an advertisement for Plasmon Oats. The advert, entitled "Prisoners Ill in Germany", contained the following letter written by Fred W. Hanson and Stanley Lambert on September 8th 1915:
Englanderlager, Ruhleben,
8th September, 1915.
 
Dear Sir,
 
We beg to thank you in the name of this camp for the sixty-seven cases of Prisoners' Comforts which you so generously sent us through the Prisoners of War Help Committee. We found the contents most acceptable, especially the Plasmon Cocoa and Plasmon Oats which were a great boon, particularly to those who required special diet.

(Signed) 
 
FRED W. HANSON,
STANLEY LAMBERT.
Barrack Superintendents.
 
To the Editor, "Khaki Magazine," London.
After his release, Hanson continued to lobby for the more humane treatment of British prisoners at Ruhleben, and in July 1916 visited the German civilian internment camp at Islington to compare the standards afforded to them by the British. He submitted a letter to The Times on the matter, which was duly published on July 20th 1916 ("Treatment of Prisoners", p.9, col. F).
 
A further letter by Hanson on January 11th 1917 ("Ruhleben", p.9, col.F) angrily rebutted the alleged claim by Bishop Bury after a visit to Germany that "the men of Ruhleben had nothing to complain about". A rather hurt Bishop Bury responded to the claim through his own leter published in the paper on the following day ("Ruhleben", p.4, col. C).
 
The Times of October 11th 1918 carries a further letter from Hanson, asking the Government to get tough with the Germans over the Ruhleben question ("The Prisoners", p. 11, col. F).
 
NB: This may be the same unknown Hanson as noted above.
 
 

Gerald Leigh Harbottle
 
From a photo of a National Archives file from collection MT9, supplied by Marcus Bateman in March 2007, it is known that on November 29th 1916, Gerald Leigh Harbottle (of Barrack 4) was allowed to go on leave from the camp, to visit Lubeck, until December 3rd 1916. (Camp Changes, Supplement 10). Many thanks to Marcus.
 
 
Benjamin Harcoy
 
Benjamin Harcoy was a British Ruhleben prisoner released in October 1916, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper of October 9th 1916 ("Released from Ruhleben - Arrival of British Party at Rotterdam", p.6).
 
 
G. Hargrave
 
G. Hargrave is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Hargrave was a merchant seaman on board the Coralie Horlock, and interned in Barrack 4.
 
 

Harkness
 
Harkness, of London, was one of fifteen men released from Ruhleben who arrived in neutral Holland on June 7th 1916, as noted in the Times of June 8th 1916 ("War Weariness in Germany", p.7, col.C).
 
 

Herbert H. Harman
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/73, regarding enquiries over the welfare of Herbert H. Harman, a British subject who was resident in Germany at the outbreak of the war, interned at Ruhleben.
 
 
R. Harmer
 
R. Harmer is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b), supplied by senior local studies librarian David Alexander Smith in July 2008, for which I am grateful. The document notes that Harmer was interned in Barrack 17.
 
 

Harris
 
An unnamed 'Harris' was noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (1915, p.22) as being on the winning Welsh side against the Scots-Colonial team, in a friendly rugby international at the camp.
 
Harris was further noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the winning Cameron's XI side against Brearley's XI on October 7th 1916. The score was 4-2 to the Cameron team.
 
Harris was also in the Barrack 20 football team at Ruhleben, and according to issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917) played in the cup final in April 1917. The first leg was a scoreless draw, and in the rematch three days later, Barrack 20 won, 3-0.
 
A 'Harris' is further noted as being in Barrack 10 Box 1 on a postcard dated 17 FEB 1916 (?), as held now by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

A. Harris
 
A. Harris was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 
F. Harris
 
F. Harris was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 2 Copthall Avenue, E.C. (of M/c)
 
 
G. E. Harris
 
G. E. Harris was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 4 Camden Place, Preston. 
 
 
John Bruce Harris
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that John Bruce Harris was from 2 Sea View Terrace, Cadacton Barry, South Wales, and was born in llanelly in 1892. He was a mechanical engineer, and was arrested in Hamburg on 5 AUG 1914, and after a brief period of imprisonment on the hulks, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 4.
 
 

Leslie Harris
 
Australian prisoner Leslie Harris' contribution to life in the camp is recorded in the Musical Notes section of the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.14):
Mr. Leslie Harris, a compatriot of Mr. Short (Gordon Short), is a sincere and capable artist, whose appearances in Ruhleben have been mainly in the field of chamber music.
Harris' contribution was again noted in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917):

Much good work has been accomplished in the Chamber Music evenings. Two unfamiliar works have been brought to a hearing - the noble and gracious Sonata in E flat. of Brahms, for Viola and Pianoforte,a choice example of the composer's ripest period of creative activity, played with fine feeling by Messrs. J. Peebles Conn and W. Pauer; and Dvorak's Terzetto for two violins and viola, an engaging little work, played with excellent ensemble and understanding by Messrs. Peebles Conn, T. H. Marshall and Leslie Harris.

 

Valentine Arturo Harris
 
Valentine Arturo Harris is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Harris is recorded as having been born on May 28th 1896 in Buenos Aires, and is described as having been a student prior to his internment. His home address was Caixa 394, Sao Paulo, Brazil. At the time the register was recorded, Harris was noted as staying in loft A. On September 1st 1917, Harris was moved to Stadtvogtei.
 
Harris was also recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as c/o Schill and Seebohm, Whitworth Street, Manchester.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Harris (noted as Arthur V. Harriss) is listed as being from Caixa Postal 394, Sao Paula, Brazil, and as having been born in Buenos Aires in 1896. He was a student in Wesel, where he was arrested on 18 AUG 1914, and after a brief period held in Wesel, Sennelager, Bonn and Cologne, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 

William Medwin Harris
 
William Medwin Harris is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Harris is recorded as having been born on August 13th 1891 in Reading, and is described as having been a correspondent prior to his internment. His home address was 102 Broad Street, Reading. At the time the register was recorded, Harris was noted as staying in loft B.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Harriss is noted as being from 102 Broad Street, Reading, and as having been born in Reading in 1891. He worked as a correspondent in Berlin, where he was arrested on 7 OCT 1914. After a brief period held in Berlin, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 
A. J. Harrison
 
A. J. Harrison was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 73 Corporation Street, Hyde.
 
 
Jack Harrison
 
Many thanks indeed to Judy Sumray for the following contribution in February 2007:
My late father's brother, Jack Harrison, now dead, was interned at Ruhleben.  My father often told me about the parcels he and his father prepared and sent to him there. I have always assumed that my uncle was interned there because he was a foreign national. I was always told that my father's family came from Poland (then part of the Russian Empire) to England in about 1909.  I am now entertaining the possibility that they went from Poland to Germany and then England, because now that I am doing this research, other facts are coming to light which do indicate a possible spell in Germany.  My uncle's original surname was Zenober, which now appears to me to be a German rendering of the Polish name Cynober (which is the name of my father's French relations).  I do not yet know what his original first name was.  He was definitely not in the services, and I am currently looking at the possibility that he may have been sent by his father to Berlin in the Summer of 1914 with regard to properties or assets held there.  My grandfather did have extensive properties in Berlin in the 1920s and 1930s - in the part that later formed East Berlin.
 
 

John Harrison
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, John Harrison was noted as being from 41 Lins Hill Street, North Shields, and as having been born in North Shields in 1884. He was a seaman who was arrested in Hamburg on 1 AUG 1914, and after being imprisoned on the hulks there was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 7.
 
 
R. Harrison
 
Harrison is noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for the Rest of Ruhleben team against the Varsities, in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
Harrison is further recorded in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.38) with an average cricket score of 50.25 runs per inning, having scored 402 runs in total for 9 innings in several July matches, once not out.
 
Harrison's role in the Lancashire vs. Yorkshire cricket match of July 23rd 1916 is also reported:
The White Rose won by 178 to 125. For the winning side Harrison 47 and Anderson 48 battled well. Bloomer took 5 wickets for 39. hartley was the highest scorer for Lancashire with 26, and Wolstenholme took five wickets for 20.
And Harrison was further listed in this issue (p.45) as being a member of the Ruhleben Tennis Association.
 
 

Harold B. Hart
 
Harold B. Hart was an art photographer prior to the war, working for the Berlin Photographic Company. When interned, Hart developed a reputation as the camp's comedian, and appeared in several plays, one of which, "Preedy and the Countess", was so successful that he ended up with "Preedy" as his nickname.   
 
Hart is noted in the first issue of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.8) as having appeared in the play "The Great Adventurer" in the camp.
 
The National Archives holds documents from 1916 at FO383/208 regarding a request from Harold for the provision of financial assistance to his wife in England, as well as a recommendation that she should apply to the Government Committee on the Prevention and Relief of Distress.
 
In the Scotsman newspaper of January 9th 1918, Hart was interviewed upon his release from the camp, and described his theatrical career in the camp, which included performances in thirty plays.  He played Koko in "The Mikado", and also appeared in performances of "Twelfth Night" and "Lady Windermere's Fan". His last performance was in "The Gondoliers", which had had a run of a fortnight in the camp, prior to his release ("Life in Ruhleben - Stories of Returned Civil Prisoners", p.5).
 
 
Frank G. Harrison-Dea??
 
Frank was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
His surname is double-barrelled, but the second name is difficult to make out from the paper.
 
 

Sidney Milton Hart
 
Sidney Milton Hart was noted as an inmate at Ruhleben through the following Personals column notice in The Times of June 16th 1921:
Mr. SIDNEY MILTON HART, who was released from internment at Ruhleben in 1918, should COMMUNICATE with B. Thormann, Berlin, Warmannstrasse, 25 - 28.
Sidney was in fact one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 10.
 
 

Hartley
 
Hartley was described in the Scotsman newspaper of January 10th 1916 (p.10) as being a professional footballer interned at Ruhleben.
 
Hartley was noted in the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p. 29) as having been a member of a football team led by John Cameron, which defeated an opposing side led by Steve Bloomer on March 3rd 1916. And on March 13th 1916, hartley was noted as ebing the best player in the match between Barracks 7 and 17, the final score being 9-0.
 
According to the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), Hartley was the referee at the Ruhleben Football Association Cup Final on the Sunday after Easter Monday, played between Barrack 8 and Barrack 20. The result was a draw. (The replay took place on the following Wednesday, with Barrack 20 ultimately winning 3-0.)
 
Hartley was further noted in the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as having played for the losing Brearley's XI side against Cameron's XI on October 7th 1916. The score was 4-2 to the Cameron team.
 
A photo of Hartley at Ruhleben can be viewed online at the following link: Steve Bloomer's Farewell Match
 
 

William Spiers Hartley
 
William Spiers Hartley is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hartley is recorded as having been born on March 23rd 1872 in Skipton, Yorkshire, and is described as having been a carding master prior to his internment. His home address was 32 Limefield Street, Accrington, Lancashire. At the time the register was recorded, Hartley was noted as staying in box 23, having arrived from Tuchel on April 21st 1918.
 
 

Hans L. Hartman (Hartmann)
 
Hans L. Hartman is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hartman is recorded as having been born on October 23rd 1890 in Leytonstone, and is described as having been a clerk prior to his internment. His home address was Wilhelmstr. 21, Solingen. At the time the register was recorded, Hartman was noted as staying in loft A, having transferred there from Barrack 12 on October 22nd 1915.
 
Between December 3rd 1917 and January 5th 1918, Hartmann spent some time being treated at the Lazarett. On April 29th 1918, he was given indefinite leave from the camp.
 
Hartman is recorded in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.38) with an average cricket score of 55.37 runs per inning, having scored 443 runs in total for 8 innings in several July matches, once not out.
 
Hartman was also noted in the football section of the fifth issue of the magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as being a member of Barrack 5.
 
 

W. H. Hartnell
 
W. H. Hartnell, of London, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7). He was the chief officer of the SS Brussels.
 
The National Archives in London hold records from 1916 at FO383/201 confirming that he and other crew members, were being held in Ruhleben Camp in Germany.

ssbrussels.jpg
The wreck of the S. S. Brussels

The Times of July 27th 1926 gave the outcome of a long investigation into the execution by the Germans of Hartnell's superior officer, Captain Fryatt, concluding that it was indeed murder ("Ten Years Ago", p. 13, col. G). Hartnell and Captain Fryatt had both been captured by the Germans on June 22nd 1916 after an incident concerning their ship, the Brussels, and a German submarine, U33. The Germans accused Fryatt of having tried to ram their submarine, and arrested him and the crew, sending them all to Ruhleben. On June 30th, Hartnell, as first officer, along with his captain, was arrested in the camp and taken to Bruges, where both were interned for three weeks. Fryatt was charged on suspicion of having attempted to cause injury to the forces of Germany, and after a court martial, was found guilty and sentenced to death. Fryatt...
"...was allowed a few minutes walk in the prison yard, and at 5 o' clock Mr. Hartnell was permitted to visit him in his cell. An hour later a Lutheran minister entered and warned him to prepare for death at once. His last thoughts were of his family, of his wife and seven children, and to the chaplain he confided their names.."
Fryatt was executed by firing squad, but Hartnell's fate was not recorded.
 
 
Arthur J. Harvey
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Ruhleben POW Arthur J. Harvey was from 37 Bosworth Street, Leicester, and was born in Barwell on September 12th 1883. He was a clerk, arrested in Frankfurt on November 6th 1914, after which he was sent to Giessen and then Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 2.
 
 

Henry Stafford Hatfield
 
Henry Stafford Hatfield was appointed in March 1915 to be on the committee of the camp's Education Department, as recorded in the Scotsman on 29/3/1915 (p.8) and the Times on 29/3/1915 ("More and Better Food at Ruhleben" p.4 col A). The department's remit was to control and administer the schools, classes, lectures, library and newspapers.
 
In this capacity, Hatfield apologisted to T. Sullivan in the seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp (Sep 1915 p.38) for an article in the previous issue entitled "Stolen midnight interviews No. 2. Mr O' Sullivan of Ballysport" which "contained expressions that might be misunderstood in a sense depricatory" to him.
 
According to the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915), Hatfield resided at Barrack 3, box 10 (p.2). He was also unfortunately verbally castrated by the Ruhleben Dramatic Society in the same issue, on the tenth page:
"Mr. Hatfield has received the following:
 
"Dear Hatfield: - I am instructed by the Committee of the Ruhleben Dramatic Society to give you the follwing reply to your application for permission to produce the "Master Builder". The committee of the Ruhleben Dramatic Society have considered Mr. Hatfield's English translation of the "Master Builder" and regret they are unable to pass it as they do not consider it fit for Ruhleben. The play as translated possesses no dramatic merit, is absolutely deficient in action and the dialogue, in the opinion of the Committee does not obtain the necessary level to compensate for these deficiencies. Yours - W. J. Crossland Briggs.
 
"Poor old Hatfield and poor old Ibsen too!"
On page 19 of the same issue, he was noted as being a member of the Ruhleben Dramatic Society.
 
Hatfield's presence in the camp's university was also noted by Francis Gribble, in his essay entitled "Leaves From a Ruhleben Notebook".
"At the head of it (university) was the Science and Arts Union, organised by Mr. Hattfield, a distinguished chemist..."
Hatfield eventually died on December 8th 1966, with his obituary recorded in The Times of December 14th 1966 ("Dr. H. S. Hatfield", p.12, col. F). After the war, Hatfield had a successful career as an inventor and electro-chemist. At his death, he left a widow, three sons and a daughter, Isabella Warren, who kindly confirmed his internment in August 2007.
 
 

John S. Hatfield
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, John S. Hatfield was noted as being from "Ralston", Sutton, Surrey, and as having been born in Mexico City, Mexico, in 1894. He was arrested in Wernigerode on 1 SEP 1914. After a brief period held in Alten Grabow, and Magdeburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 7.
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/53 regarding the intention of Ruhleben inmate John Hatfield of Sutton, Surrey, to establish an information bureau for the benefit of relatives and to assist fellow prisoners, and includes the first two of his bulletins.
 
Two postcards from a John S. Hatfield have been foudn on sale at eBay - the first to a Mrs Perthick of 77 Warrington Crescent, London, the second a Christmas card signed by him in 1915. Possibly the same gentleman.
 
 

Alfred Wilkinson Hatt
 
Alfred Wilkinson Hatt is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hatt is recorded as having been born on January 12th 1895 in London, and is described as having been a clerk prior to his internment. His home address was 80 Durham Road, East Finchley, N. At the time the register was recorded, Hatt was noted as staying in box 10. His father Charles and brother William were also interned at the camp.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Hatt is noted as being from 80 Durham Road, East Finchley, London, and as having been born in London in 1895. He worked as an engineer's assistant in Duisburg, and was arrested on 11 SEP 1914. After a brief period held in Sennelager and Duisburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 
Charles William Hatt
 
Charles William Hatt is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hatt is recorded as having been born on June 23rd 1864 in London, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was 80 Durham Road, East Finchley, N. At the time the register was recorded, Hatt was noted as staying in box 10, and according to the register was later released back to England on August 7th 1918. However, the files at the National Archives MT9/1238 suggest he was released on March 6th 1918. Hatt's two sons Alfred and William were also interned at the camp.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Hatt is again noted as being from 80 Durham Road, East Finchley, and as having been born in London in 1864. He was an engineer in Duisburg, where he was arrested on 8 AUG 1914. After a brief period held in Duisburg he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 
William Herbert Hatt
 
William Herbert Hatt is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hatt is recorded as having been born on March 25th 1892 in London, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was 80 Durham Road, East Finchley, N. At the time the register was recorded, Hatt was noted as staying in box 14. His brother Alfred and father Charles were also interned at the camp.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Hatt is noted as being from 80 Durham Road, East Finchley, London, and as having been born in London in 1892. He worked as an engineer's assistant in Duisburg, and was arrested on 11 SEP 1914. After a brief period held in Sennelager and Duisburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 5.
 
 

N. W. Hawkins
 
In the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.6), we learn that N. W. Hawkins, of Barrack 17, returned to England on March 19th 1916.
 
 

A. J. Nelson Hawkins
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO 383/21 concerning A. J. Nelson Hawkins. Hawkins was interned at Ruhleben following his arrest at the outbreak of the war, whilst he had been working for the South African Government as an Inspecting Engineer in Hanover. The documents concern a request for a possible exchange.
 
 

W. Hawkins
 
In an article in the Scotsman newspaper of October 27th 1915, W. Hawkins was listed as captain of Barracks 13, 17 and 18 ("Ruhleben Camp - Success of Civil Administration", p.9).
 
 

Alexander Hay
 
Alexander Hay was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
Alexander was interned in Barrack 9 throughout the war and was eventually released back to England on March 7th 1918, as noted in the National Archives documents under MT9/1238.
 
 
Ernest Hay
 
A copy of a postcard from an Ernest Hay was noted by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria from an eBay lisitng, listing him as in Barrack 10 Loft 2 (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

F. W. Haydon
 
The National Archives in London hold doucments from 1915 at FO383/27 on F. W. Haydon, interned at Ruhleben, specifically an enquiry from his wife, Annie Haydon of Leeds. At Fo383/70 there are further documents held on the transfer of insurance policies, after a request from Haydon.
 
 

Haynes
 
Haynes is noted in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.14) as having played for the Rest of Ruhleben team against the Varsities, in the Ruhleben Cricket League.
 
 

E. F. Hayward
 
E. F. Hayward was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 
William Hayward
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, William Hayward was noted as being from 168 Patrick Street, Grimsby, and as having been born in Barton on Humber in 1870. He worked as a mariner and was arrested in Hamburg on 4 AUG 1914. After a brief spell imprisoned on the hulks in Hamburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 8.
 
 

Albert Head
 
The National Archives in London hold records at FO383/190 from 1916 concerning the financial position of the wife of Albert Head, an internee at Ruhleben.
 
 
A. Healey-Hislop
 
A. Healey-Hislop was a prisoner who contributed a drawing of 'Trafalgar Square' to the seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp (Sep 1915, p.5), and of the Ruhleben hospital barracks to the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917).
 
He was also previously listed in the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.43) as having exhibted in the camp's third art exhibition.
 
Healy-Hislop was thanked for his contributions to the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
 
Sam Heapy
 
Sam Heapy was mentioned as an inmate at Ruhleben in an article in the Scotsman newspaper of January 28th 1916, entitled "Racecourse Chat" p.9). In response to the parcels sent to some of the Ruhleben inmates by the jockey club in Britain, the following was recorded of Heapy:
This is a typical postcard from Sam Heapy, a nephew of Sam Loates, and for many years the leading jockey in Belgium, and when the war broke out a trainer with close upon 100 horses in his charge :- "I can assure you that the occupants of box 19 were very pleased to know they were not forgotten by their racing friends; also greatly appreciate their way of showing us such was not the case."
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1916 at FO383/206 regarding enquiries by Mr. S. J. Heapy about his son, Sam Heapy.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Heapy was from Wavre in belgium and born in 1882. He was arrested in Belgium, where he was working as a jockey, in November 1914. He was sent to Ruhleben and interned in Barrack 2.
 
 
Ted Hearn
 
Ted Hearn was noted in the Football section of the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as being responsible for the football ground, along with two other inmates, George Page and Sam Coles.
 
 
E. Hearne
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that E. Hearne was from 41 Broughton Street, Edinburgh, and was born in Canning Town in 1882. He was described as 'late of R.N.' (Royal Navy) Danzig, and was arrested on 4 AUG 1914, and after a brief period of imprisonment in Stralsund was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 4.
 
He may be the Ted Hearn noted above.
 
 

Hearst
 
Hearst was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Scotsman newspaper on January 31st 1917 ("British Civilians From Ruhleben", p.6).
 
 
Bradley Heath
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Bradley Heath is noted as being from 54 Stratford Road, Wolverton, Bucks. He was a clerk, arrested in Lubeck on 6 NOV 1914, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 6.
 
 

Frank Heath
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Frank Heath was resident at 54 Stratford Road, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, was born in Macclesfield, Cheshire on 19 APR 1889, was a teacher of languages, was arrested in Stettin on 6 NOV 1914, and after a brief period confined in Stettin was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 1.
 
Heath was noted as playing on the England side, led by Steve Bloomer, in a mock international between England and the Rest of the World on May 2nd 1915. Kick off took place at 4.30pm, and a document with the teams listed was recently discovered amongst some Foreign Office files by the National Archives, in November 2005.
 
 
William Heath
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that William Heath was formerly resident at Queens Hotel, Leicester Square, London, and was born in Birmingham in 1888. He was a jockey and was arrested in Berlin, imprisoned in the Stadtvogtei prison and then sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 2. 
 
 
A. G. Heather
 
A. G. Heather is noted in the seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp as being responsible for the tuition of Spanish at the camp's school (Sep 1915, p.18).
 
 

Ernst Heimann
 
The National Archives hold documents from 1915 at FO383/63 regarding Mrs. Minnie Heimann, wife of British subject Ernst Heimann, interned at Ruhleben, and an application for remittance of money to her from the UK.
 
Heimann was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as c/o Jones Bros., Ltd., 12 York Street, Manchester. 
 
 
P. Heineann
 
P. Heineann was noted as having resided in Barrack 2 Box 4 on a letter dated 4 FEB 1916, as held in a private collection by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria (many thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 
Heinemann
 
Heinemann was the recipient of a note which was later placed on sale on eBay in October 2006. The only detail on the envelope is that he was based in the Teahouse.
 
Heinemann is also noted as having been in the Teahouse on a card dated 2 JAN 1916, held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

E. W. Henderson
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/50 regarding the effects of four British seamen detained at Ruhleben, namely Charles Sivier, A. Reilly, John Lewins, and E. W. Henderson, all formerly of the S.S. Monitoria. The documents regard the payment of the balance of their wages, arrangements for the delivery of their effects, and an investigation into their subsequent non-delivery, leading to the question of responsibility for their losses and possible compensation.
 
 

Henham
 
Henham is known to have been a prisoner at Ruhleben by way of a letter written to the Scotsman newspaper by his brother, A. Henham, on June 19th 1915, and published on the 21st. The letter describes how he had received a letter from his brother at Ruhleben, which explained that the Germans were now confiscating confectionery, chocolate, biscuits etc from the prisoners' regular food parcels. A. henham finished his letter to the Scotsman by saying that he would "be much obliged if you would allow this letter to appear in your columns, to warn others that in sending any such articles of food to the camp at Ruhleben they are only providing delicacies for Germans" ("British Prisoners in German Camps", p.9).
 
 

S. A. Henricksen
 
S. A. Henriksen was the chief officer of the steamer Wardane, who was interned in Ruhleben.
 
Henriksen was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
Henricksen, of Liverpool, was also named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7). He was further noted as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 72 Exeter Road, Bootle.
 
The seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp describes him as teaching the nautical classes in the camp's school, and describes hims as "Capt. Henriksen Ex. Capt.".
 
He also had the 'honour' to be lampooned by way of a monogram drawn in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), by artist CMAW.
 
The Times of February 18th 1919, carries a report that Henriksen was presented with a pair of binoculars by Rear-Admiral Bernard, paid for by subscription by his fellow former inmates at Ruhleben in apprecation of his work in organising navigation and engineering classes throughout the four years internment ("News in Brief", p.5, col. F).
 
 
John Henrickson (also Henrichson)
 
John Henrickson was a carpenter on board the Auk prior to being interned in Ruhleben, in Barrack 9. His home address before the war was 9 Well Street, London. He was eventually released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

Leigh Vaughan Henry
 
Leigh Vaughan Henry is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Henry is recorded as having been born on September 23rd 1889 in Liverpool, and is described as having been a composer author prior to his internment. His home address was 117 Adelaide Road, London N. At the time the register was recorded, Henry was noted as staying in loft B, having transferred there from Barrack 3 on May 12th 1917. Henry escaped from Ruhleben on February 7th 1918. 
 
Henry was noted in issue two of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.12) as intending to submit "A Midsummer Night's Dream" for production to the committee of the Ruhleben Dramatic Society, along with Andy Reynolds. He is also noted on page 19 as being a member of the Society, and on page 28 as having co-produced the play "As You Like It" with fellow inmate C. Duncan Jones, through the Ruhleben Dramatic Society.
 
In the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magzine (August 1916, p.25), Henry is listed as to soon be giving a lecture:
The present arrangements include two lectures by Mr. Short on the Development of Chamber Music, with musical illustrations on each occasion, while Mr. Leigh Henry, Mr. Hunt and Mr. Weber are respectively undertaking similar evenings on works of Debussy, MacDowell and Verdi.
Later in the same issue (p.33), Henry's contribution to Duncan Jones' production of "Twelfth Night" is noted:
Mr. Henry's scenic and costume designs projected atmospheres which were pure and transparent, being immediately felt without any troubling adjustment of the mind.
In issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917) Leigh Henry is listed as having co-produced the play "Tantris der Narr", along with fellow inmate J. Stein.
 
 
Robert John Henry
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Robert John Henry was from 33 Beverstone Road, Thornton Heath, Surrey, and born in Newry, Ireland, in 1888. He was a wireless operator arrested in Hamburg on 16 OCT 1914. After a spell on the hulks he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 

W. F. Herbert
 
W. F. Herbert, of Penarth, South Wales, was arrested at the outbreak of the war in germany and interned at Ruhleben. He was released in January 1918, and an interview with him appeared in the Scotsman newspaper of January 9th 1918, in which he mainly talked about the food situation in the camp, and the journey by train to Holland after he was released from the camp ("Life in Ruhleben - Stories of Returned Civil Prisoners", p.5).
 
 
Edward Herliky (or Herlihy)
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Edward Herliky was noted as being from 108 Sands Street, Liverpool, and as having been born in Liverpool in 1892. He worked as a seaman and was arrested in Hamburg on 16 OCT 1914. After a brief spell imprisoned on the hulks in Hamburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 8.
 
Marcus bateman notes from MT9/1238 at TNA that his surname was Herlihy, and that he was an AB seaman, resident at 37 Kent Street, Park Lane, Liverpool. His vessel was the Zealand.
 
 

Hersee
 
Hersee is noted in the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.32) as having produced the play "Jimmie's Last Crime", written by Crossland and Hallam, which was performed on March 23rd 1916.
 
 

George Noel Heslop
 
George Noel Heslop is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Heslop is recorded as having been born on December 21st 1888 in Goole, and is described as having been a sailor on the "Edwin Hunter" prior to his internment. His home address was 3 Widop Street, Goole. At the time the register was recorded, Heslop was noted as staying in loft A, having transferred there from Barrack 23 on September 15th 1915.
 
Heslop is also recorded as having spent some time in the Schonungsbaracke between July 9th 1918 and July 12th.
 
 
Frank Hessin
 
Frank Hessin was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 10. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
In July 2008 I received the following additional information on Hessin from Rex Dawson, who runs the www.pianola.org website, for which I am extremely grateful.
At the outbreak of war, F.W. Hessin was in charge of the Choralion Company in Berlin, the German subsidiary of the Aeolian Company, essentially an American musical instrument empire. I could imagine that other Choralion/Aeolian staff ended up at Ruhleben as well.

Aeolian is best remembered as the manufacturer of the Pianola and Pianola Piano, but it also made roll-operated reed and pipe organs, and ordinary organs and pianos as well. The Choralion Saal in Berlin, at Bellevuestrasse 4, was one of the centres of fashionable music making in the city. Schoenberg's "Pierrot Lunaire" had its first performances there, Stravinsky visited, Humperdinck, Rachmaninov (I suspect) and many others called in. Some of the buildings in Bellevuestrasse became the headquarters of the Gestapo, and Hitler's bunker was just down the road, so there was nothing left in 1945. Nowadays there is a lamp-post with the number "4" on it, to which I give a friendly hug on my trips there. It's just behind the Sony Centre.

Hessin came from Toronto originally, and worked for Aeolian in the USA before being sent to Berlin around 1904. He remained there until the War, was interned, and afterwards returned to the USA, where he became Treasurer of the main Aeolian Company. Later in the 1920s he was chairman of Aeolian in Britain for a while.
 
 
 
John Hewitt
 
John Hewitt was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 2. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
Hewitt was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 2 Clifton Street, Failsworth.
 
 

Norman Hewitt
 
Part of Norman Hewitt's contribution to Ruhleben life was noted in issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917):
"ARTS AND SCIENCE UNION. The evening of modern music arranged by Mr. Norman Hewitt was a great artistic success. The chief interest of the evening centred in the performance of several works by our fellow "interned", Mr. Roland Bocquet. It was good to hear from the Pianoforte Ballade played once again in its original form, after the astounding orchestral caricature which had been offered to the Camp on a former memorable occasion. In this work, and in pieces by Debussy and Ravel, Mr. Hewitt was heard to greater advantage than on any previous occasion in Ruhleben, his playing being marked by notable sincerity of purpose and musical feeling. It was, however, in a group of songs that Bocquet's work was heard at its best. The writer of these notes knows of no other living composer who can set words with such perfect regard for all the nuances of the lyrical rhythm and at the same time produce works of such sheer musical beauty. While there is much one would like to say about the different songs presented on this occasion, exigencies of space prevent more than a brief reference to one particularly choice example - a setting of Baudelaire's "Recuillement", which may truly be described as a perfect musical counterpart of this fine poem. The songs were very beautifully sung by M. Edward Bonhote."
Hewitt was also recorded in The Times as being about to give a concert at the Ruhleben Exhibition on Friday, February 7th, with fellow former Ruhleben musicians, all of whom had been professional musicians captured in Bayreuth. The article appeared on January 30th 1919 in the Times ("Ruhleben Exhibition", p.11, col. F).
 
 
Wallace Hewitt
 
Wallace Hewitt was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 2 Clifton Street, Failsworth.
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Hewitt was from 50 Drury Lane, Hollinwood, Manchester, and was born in Failsworth on October 6th 1892. He was a jam works manager, arrested in Wittenburg on August 30th 1914 and sent to Alten-Grabow and then Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 2.
 
 

Ernest Hey
 
Ernest Hey posted a card from Ruhleben which later ended up forn sale on E-Bay in May 2005. The card addressed, to Mrs. Beatrice Whitby, Hon. Asst. Secretary, Washington Buildings, High Pavement, Nottingham, tells us that Hey was interned in Barrack 10, loft 2. The reverse of the card was not displayed on the auction page.
 
 

Heymann
 
Heymann was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Scotsman newspaper on January 31st 1917 ("British Civilians From Ruhleben", p.6).
 
He is possibly the Dr. Alex Heymann noted in Dr. Weiler's Sanitorium in Berlin on two letters, one dated 7 AUG 1915 to Genf and the other 11 OCT 1915 to Genf, as held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber of Grand Canaria (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

Hickley (brothers)
 
The Hickley brothers were noted as prisoners in Ruhleben in an article in the Scotsman newspaper of March 11th 1916 ("Released from Ruhleben", p.7):
Locked up in another place were Mr. Sylvester, Mr. S. Pearson, and the brothers Hickley, all of Nottingham. After being taken to Berlin, they were sent to Ruhleben, where they found the camp very rough for a time.
 
 

W. Hicks
 
W. Hicks, of Liverpool, was named in a list of merchant seamen interned at Ruhleben, as published by the Scotsman newspaper on 7/1/1915 (p.7).
 
 

Dr. E. Higgins
 
Dr. E. Higgins was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as Lace Street, Liverpool.
 
He is noted in the seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp as having given a paper on "Some Experiments in Chemical Composition and Physical Behaviour" on September 1st 1915 (Sept. 1915, p.2).
 
It is likely that this is the Higgins noted in the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.36) as having given a science lecture on "Food and Food Products".
 
A Dr. Higgins is also noted on a copy of an invite card sent to me in Oct 2007 by Denis Camps, which shows that he was due to give a lecture on 'Industrial Employment' to the Social Problems Circle in the Loft of Barrack 6, on February 9th 1916 at 7.00pm.
 
 
B. Higginson
 
B. Higginson was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as Romiley Arms, Romiley.
 
 
Leonard E. Hilby
 
Leonard E. Hilby was recorded by fellow internee Christopher Cornforth, in an autograph book now held at the Imperial War Museum.
 
Many thanks to Christopher's granddaughter Christine Pierce who provided this information in December 2007.
 
 

Hill
 
Hill is recorded in the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.22) as being a member of the English rugby team that beat Wales in a series of friendly internationals held at the camp.
 
Hill was also noted in the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p. 29) as having been a member of a football team led by John Cameron, which defeated an opposing side led by Steve Bloomer on March 3rd 1916.
 
Hill was also noted in the football section of the fifth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (Christmas 1916, p.58) as being a member of Barrack 10, and of being the goal keeper.
 
 

Alfred Hill
 
Alfred Hill, B.SC and B.Sc (Agriculture) was a former assistant in agricultural chemistry. He was interned in Ruhleben and in the Scotsman newspaper of July 19th 1915 was noted as being interned in Barrack 2, Loft B. The article contained the wording of a postcard that Hill sent to Principal Smith of Aberdeen University:
Greetings to my Alma Mater. My thoughts often carry me off to the 'Silver City by the Sea' and to my many friends I left behind me, many of whom perhaps have done their duty in this terrible conflict. Life here in Ruhleben is somewhat monotonous, but bearable. The organisation of the camp is going on apace, and educational matters receive due consideration. Still, we are all longing for the time when all rumours of exchange shall become realities.- ALFRED HILL, former Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry.
Hill is also noted in the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.36) as having given a science lecture on "Food and Food Products".
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Hill was resident at 72 Bedford Place, Aberdeen, and was born in Aberdeen in 1887. He was a teacher and was arrested in Berlin on November 6th 1914, and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 2.
 
 

Arnold W. Hill

The National Archives holds documents at FO383/26 on a 1915 medical examination of Arnold W. Hill, a Ruhleben inmate. Further documents are held at FO383/66 regarding an enquiry from Hill's father, Mr. A. Hill of Coventry, regarding a possible exchange of his son for a German subject, Heinri Gruenwald, resident in Llandudno.  

The archives also hold documents from 1916 at FO383/207 regarding a request by the Ministry of Munitions of War for attempts to obtain Hill's release or exchange from Ruhleben.

Hill was photographed as a member of the Ruhleben Parcel Post team - see entry for Alfred Hazell King for the photo.

 

H. H. L. Hill
 
H. H. L. Hill, of London, was one of fifteen men released from Ruhleben who arrived in neutral Holland on June 7th 1916, as noted in the Times of June 8th 1916 ("War Weariness in Germany", p.7, col.C).
 
 

Robert Hiller
 
The National Archives in London hold records from 1915 concerning Robert Hiller, a British civil prisoner of war interned at Ruhleben, concerning relief for his wife, Mrs. Berta Hiller. and his destitute family, resident in Stepney, England. There are also enquiries regarding the nationality of Hiller, and a report that he was over age when his father was naturalised and so was not a British subject.
 
 
Andrew Hislop
 
Andrew Hislop was named in an undated Foreign Office document contained within file FO 369/710, entitled Russenlager Ruhleben (Ruhleben Russian Camp), implying it was compiled at the outbreak of internment in 1914. He was described as a 27 year old student previously at work in Berlin.
 
As Hislob he was also listed in another file in FO 369/710 dated 11 OCT 1914. This list was communicated to the Foreign Office by a Nurse Coe (with thanks to Simon Fowler).
 
 
Hodges
 
In a list of prisoners from the Wolf transferred to Ruhleben in A. H. F. Clarke's "To Kiel on the German Raider Wolf and Beyond", Hodges is noted as a Ruhleben prisoner from Ceylon, captured on the ship Hitachi Maru in early 1918. See entry for Alfred Henry Frank Clarke.
 
 

Denis Hodgins
 
Denis Hodgins was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
 
 
Hodgkinson
 
Hodkinson was noted in the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.18) as having won second prize in a competition run by the Debating Society. If this was a belated article, then this may have been J. Hodgkinson, released in March 1916.
 
 

Joseph Hodgkinson
 
Joseph Hodgkinson was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
In the second issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (April 1916, p.6), we learn that J. Hodgkinson, of Barrack 4, returned to England on March 19th 1916.
 
 
J. Hodgson
 
J. Hodgson was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as c/o West and Co., 88 Old Kent Road, London, S.E.
 
 

Percy Hodgson
 
Percy Hodgson was on a tour of various European theaters in 1916, when he and his fellow cast members were arrested and then subsequently interned in Ruhleben, where they were to remain until the end of the war. As a performer, Percy's stage name was Percy Maurice.

As one of the "Maurice Brothers", Percy is noted in the first issue of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.8) as having appeared in the 1915 Christmas pantomime in the camp. The other "Maurice Brother" was Walter, although his real name is as yet unknown.
 
Also as Percy Maurice, Hodgson is then noted in the first issue of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.8) as having appeared in the play "Major Barbara" in the camp, and as having rendered several scenes from the play for Kapp's lecture entitled "Drama as a Work of Art" (p.36)
 
After the end of the war, Percy returned to England, and performed at various theatres in London, such as the Queen's Hall, under the name of the "Ruhleben Follies", with fellow cast members including Alec Underwood, Walter Maurice, F. Winter (the Kaiser's ex-jockey), F. Nichols, and Billy Collinson.

More information on Percy is available at a Rootsweb posting made by his daughter Pamela Sprossell on September 1st 1998, which can be viewed at the following link: Percy Hodgson

 

George William Hohenrein
 
George William Hohenrein was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
 
Hohenrein and his son William were both interned at Ruhleben. In June 2008 I received the following from David Smith, Local Studies Librarian at Hull Local Studies Library, for which I am eternally grateful.
The Hohenrein family were very well known in Hull as successful pork butchers. George Frederick Hohenrein emigrated from Germany to Hull in 1850, he became a British citizen and married in Hull. His two sons George William and Charles were born in Hull as British citizens. In 1909 George William moved back to Germany with his wife and children and in 1914 he and his son were interred at Ruhleben.

Back in Hull Charles received threats that his butcher's shops would be "broken up" and as a result of this and the bad feeling towards Germans during WWI he decided to close the shops until the war was over. In addition to this Charles changed the family surname to Ross. After the war the shops re-opened and were very successful again. Charles was a prominent man in the local business community and was also involved in the building/running of cinema's in Hull in the 1930s.

The Hull Local Studies Library holds the Hohenrein collection which is a mixture of family and business items. However, the following relate to Ruhleben:

1) A list of the people interred at Ruhleben. There are two versions of this: a handwritten list dated 9th December 1914 and a typed list with no date on it, but the latter provides further information (e.g. barracks number, whether they are civilian or from a ship).

2) Three letters, two written by George William Hohenrein and one written by William Hohenrein (George W.'s son), from Ruhleben camp to Charles Hohenrein in Hull. They are dated: 15th March 1915, 16th July 1916 and 21st June 1916. The letters do mention receiving food parcels from Britain.

3) Three letters written by George Hohenrein from Wurzburg. George had been given special permission to visit his wife and daughter here - both of whom were ill. The letters are dated 22nd December 1916, 24th January 1917 and 1st November 1917. In one of the letters George talks about William having to return to Ruhleben.

4) A newscutting from the Eastern Morning News dated 12th January 1918 in which George Hohenrein describes conditions in Ruhleben and the rationing/conditions in Berlin and Wurzburg.

 
Hohenrein is noted on a list of prisoners of war on a document entitled 'Men in Englander Lager, Ruhleben', held by Hull Local Studies Library (provisional catalogue entry: Hohenrein Collection F 10b). The document notes that he was a civilian interned in Barrack 7, loft, but lists him as George F. Hohenrein, which is believed to be an error, as George Frederick is not known to have been in Germany at this point.
 
David has kindly supplied additional material which will be uploaded to this site in due course. Hull Local Studies Library is located at Central Library, Albion Street, Hull, HU1 3TF. For more information visit www.hullcc.gov.uk.

georgewilliamhohenreinyeomanryc1900.jpg
George William Hohenrein in yeomanry uniform c.1900 - Courtesy of the Hull Local Studies Library

 
 
William Hohenrein
 
William was the son of George William Hohenrein - see above.
 
 

Gabriel Hohoff
 
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding Gabriel Hohoff, interned in Ruhleben, namely an enquiry from his wife, Mrs. Beatrice Hohoff (née Beatrice Cheyne), of Kensington, London.
 
 
Ernest Holden
 
See entry for Ernest Hotopf.
 
 
Fred Holland
 
Fred Holland was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 17 Plough Street, Oldham.
 
 
Harry Holland
 
Harry Holland was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 17 Plough Street, Oldham.
 
 

J. P. Hollis
 
J. P. Hollis was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
 
Herbert Hollom
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Herbert Hollom was from 24 Stamford Brook Road, Ravenscourt Park Road in West London, and born in Middlesex in 1895. he was a student in Bentheim before being arrested on 30 AUG 1914 and sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 3.
 
 

Charles Holt

 

Charles Holt was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as Lancaster Villa, Albert Road, Levenshulme.

 

The following letter by Holt was published in the Manchester Guardian on October 15th 1915 (p. 3).

BOOTS AND SOCKS FOR RUHLEBEN

 

Mr Charles Holt, who is a civilian prisoner of war in the Ruhleben Camp, Berlin, Germany, has written to his wife to the effect that if she wishes to be of valuable help to the "distressed interned in the camp" will she appeal to the friends at home for men's boots and socks. he asks for the boots to have good strong soles to withstand bad weather such as was experienced last winter. The sizes mostly needed are from 7 to 8 1/2. Mrs C. Holt's address is c/o Mr Thomas Scott, 54 Osborn Road, Levenshulme, and she will undertake to receive any boots and socks., or small subscriptions for repairs, and will send them to Mr. Holt, who will see they are distributed to the most deserving cases.

 

 

James B. Holt
 
James B. Holt was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."

Holt was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as Springfield, Dunham Woodhouses, Altrincham.

 

Further information was received from Hamburg based golf historian Christopher N. Meister in November 2007.

James B. Holt was a golfing professional at the Hamburger Golf Club at Großflottbek from 1911 to 1914, when he was arrested and sent to Ruhleben. After World War I he worked as a golf professional at Bowdon, Chester from 1919 at least until 1938.

 

T. Holt

 

T. Holt was a professional golfer, based at Hamburg in 1911, who was interned at Ruhleben. Many thanks to David Hamilton at St. Andrews for supplying this information in December 2006.

 

 

H. F. Honnywill
 
The National Archives in London hold a 1915 document at FO383/26 regarding H. F. Honnywill, a British subject temporarily released for medical treatment.
 
 

J. R. Hooker
 
J. R. Hooker was noted in issue six of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917) as having satisfied the examiners at the London Matriculation Examination, held in the camp in December 1916.
 
 

H. W. A. Hopf
 
The National Archives in London contain documents from 1915 at FO 383/25, FO 383/26 and FO383/27 relating to H. W. A. Hopf, an invalided British subject interned at Ruhleben. The documents concern the possible release of Hopf on health grounds following a letter to the Foreign Office from his wife, Mrs. Marianne Hopf of Rugby, and in FO383/27 further enquiries from his wife and from the High Commissioner for the Union of South Africa, regarding his possible exchange, along with that of F. W. Hanson.
 
The archives hold further documents from 1916 at FO383/207 regarding letters by Mrs Marianne Hopf (née Thomson) requesting the transfer of her husband, Mr H W A Hopf to Switzerland on health grounds, or his repatriation to Transvaal in the Union of South Africa, as well as attempts to obtain a British passport for him. The documents also include an extract from The Daily Mail of September 8th 1916 reporting on Hopf's sentence to solitary confinement for a month.
 
 

Albert Edward Hopkins
 
Albert Edward Hopkins was listed in The Times of January 8th 1916 ("Released Civilians" p.5, col. D) as one of 69 men released from Ruhleben on Thursday, January 6th, 1916, who subsequently travelled to Flushing for their return trip to England.
 
 

W. T. Hopkins
 
W. T. Hopkins was recorded in the Times of July 8th 1916 ("Back from Germany", p.7, col.A) as arriving at Gravesend on July 7th 1916, having been released from Ruhleben.
 
 

Hubert G. Hopkirk
 
Hubert G. Hopkirk was a prisoner in Barrack 7, Box 27. A letter to Mr Hopkirk, from a Mr H. A. Bell in Loft 6, was discovered for sale on the internet site E-bay in 2005, and the contents of the letter were noted as follows:

rxdebay1.jpg

Redacteur: H. Alf. Bell
Ruhleben (Loft 6) le 1er Mars 1916
 
Cher Monsieur,
 
Il me servit agreable de recevoir votre chronique theatrel des pieds depuis Noel, aussitot que possible.
 
Vous remerciant a l' (???)
 
Sinceres salut
 
H. A. Bell.
Hopkirk was also involved in the Ruhleben Theatrical Society, and in the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (August 1916, p.33), is noted as having been in the play "Othello":
It is more difficult to arrive at a just appreciation of the performances of Othello which, with Twelfth Night, represented the dramatic section of the festival and brought the celebrations to a conclusion. Mr. Hopkirks's rendering of Othello was a powerful and carefully thought-out study, which realised both as regards method and professional finish the expectations of those who had seen this accomplished actor in L' Enfant Prodigue. The production as a whole did not support his acting either in quality or point of view. Just as the rich costumes, too heavy, seemed laid on the lighter Ruhleben scenery which they pushed back into a dim, painted flimsiness, so Mr. Hopkirk's intenser dramatisation overwhelmed the action, reducing the cast to a crowd of puppet-like shadows...
The performance was also noted in the Scotsman newspaper of May 15th 1916 ("Shakespeare Celebrations in Ruhleben", p.7).
 
 

Dr. Hopp
 
Dr. Hopp was an interned South African in Ruhleben who was reported in the Times of September 8th 1916 as having been reported for an offence during a period of illness and duly placed into solitary confinemtn, suffering such mental torture and pain that opium had to be given to him to relieve the symptoms. The article quoted the source, Abraham Johnson, as saying that it was not expected that Hopp would survivve for much longer ("Returned Prisoners' Stories", p.5, col. D).
 
 

J. Galbraith Horn
 
The National Archives in London contain documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding J. Galbraith Horn, a released prisoner from Ruhleben who relocated to Paris, which contain information on his experiences whilst interned at Ruhleben. FO383/69 also holds Horn's pamphlet on Ruhleben following his release.
 
 
H. Horsefield
 
H. Horsefield was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 9 Grosvenor Street, Prestwich.
 
 
Wilfrid Horsefield
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, we learn that Wilfrid Horsefield was from Heaton Park, Manchester, where he was born on 1 AUG 1890. He was a book keeper, and was arrested in Hamburg in August 1914, and after a brief period of imprisonment on the hulks, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 4.
 
The Manchester Guardian of August 19th 1915 (p. 6) names W. Horsefield as having participated in a Lancashire versus Yorkshire Cricket match at Ruhleben.
 
 

Charles M. Horsfall
 
Charles M. Horsfall regularly contributed pencil drawn sketches to the various Ruhleben camp magazines. In the Scotsman newspaper of April 12th 1916, he is noted as having contributed to the "Prisoners' Pie" annual, printed in Ruhleben ("Prisoners Pie - A Souvenir of Ruhleben Camp", p.5).
 
Amongst his many drawings for the Ruhleben Camp Magazine, Horsfall sketched Stanley Lambert for the first issue (March 1916), the kitchen staff for the second issue (April 1916), and Steve Bloomer and J. D. Gilbert for the sixth issue (June 1917).
 
Horsfall is also listed in the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.43) as having exhibted in the camp's third art exhibition.
 
Horsfall was thanked for his contributions to the Ruhleben Camp Magazine by its editor, C. G. Pemberton, in the fifth issue (Christmas 1916, p.62).
 
Horsfall was noted as having resided in Barrack 3 Box 8 on a postcard from 17 NOV 1917, as held in a private collection by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria. (Many thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
After the war, Horsfall was also recorded at the Ruhleben Exhibition on the day that the Crown Princess of Sweden visited. The article appeared on January 30th 1919 in the Times ("Ruhleben Exhibition", p.11, col. F). The Times of February 5th 1919 also tells us that the princess returned on February 4th to the exhibition, and purchased 40 paintings, with the painters selected including Horsfall ("Court News", p.11, col. B).  
 
 
Ernest Hotopf
 
Ernest was a POW interned from 1914-1918 at Ruhleben. When writing home he did so under the name of Ernest Holden. Many thanks to Ernest's granddaughter Caroline Hotopf for providing this information in February 2007.
 
 
G. Houghton
 
G. Houghton was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 6 Mona Street, Garston, Liverpool.
 
 

Frank Houvenaghel
 
Frank Houvenaghel was a Dutch seaman and member of the crew of the Wilson liner "Castro". He was interned in Ruhleben shortly after his detention in Germany in mid-July 1914. He was released back to Holland in March 1915, and gave an account of his time in the camp to the Times newspaper, published 22/3/1915 ("Ill Treatment of British Prisoners" p.7, col. F) and the Scotsman newspaper, published on 22/3/1915 (p.5). His account pointed out the wretched condition of the camp at that point, and detailed how English prisoners were being made to work, with armed guards overlooking them. He also described how the prisoners were heartened by the efforts of the British Relief Fund.
 
One of Houvenaghel's observations describes the good spirits of the prisoners:
The British prisoners, he said, were full of spirit, and refused to believe the news of a disaster to England which was recited to them on the day of the Kaiser's birthday. They had to rig up a flagstaff, but they cut the halyard, with the result that when the (German) flag was run up the next day it immediately fell to the ground. The British prisoners thereupon sang their National Anthem, and shouted "Three cheers for England," but they were punished for it.
 
 

A. E. Howard
 
On April 27th 1916, A. E. Howard gave a lecture in Ruhleben on Shakespeare's lyrics, as part of a Shakespeare week at the camp, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper of May 15th 1916 ("Shakespeare Celebrations in Ruhleben", p.7).
 
 

Richard Mortimore Howard
 
Richard Mortimore Howard is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Howard is recorded as having been born on August 2nd 1870 in Washington USA, and is described as having been an animal trainer prior to his internment. His home address was the Circus Paul Wilke c/o Das Programm, Berlin, W.8. At the time the register was recorded, Howard was noted as staying in loft B, and is noted as having returned to England on January 2nd 1918.
 
Mortimore Howard set up and ran an exchange and mart in the camp. In the second issue of In Ruhleben Camp (June 1915, p.16). he placed the following advert:
The Ruhleben Exchange and Mart, Bar 5B, originated and conducted by Mortimore Howard.
In the seventh issue of In Ruhleben Camp (Sep 1915, p.40), he advertised the sale of the "music, colour and manuscript" of "The Jellograph", and his printing works were advertised as operating from Barrack 5B.
 
In the third issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (May 1916, p.30), Howard's shop is made fun of in the following short piece:
BY THE WAY
 
Mr. Mortimore Howard regrets to announce that, although the "Exchange and Mart" is a private concern, he is unable to arrange private exchanges.
A further cartoon in the fourth issue (August 1916, p.23), entitled "What the Rumour Did", pokes further fun at Howard's venture.
 
A receipt held by Dr. Manfred G. Heber in Grand Canaria, dated 20 MAR 1916, also lists Howard in Loft B (with thanks to Dr. Heber).
 
 

Robert Howart
 
Robert Howart was one of nine men released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Times of January 12th 1917 ("Nine Prisoners Released from Ruhleben", p.5, col. B).
 
 

Thomas Howat
 
Thomas Howat is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Howat is recorded as having been born on October 9th 1888 in Glasgow, and is described as having been a manager prior to his internment. His home address was 42 Carnarvon Street, Glasgow At the time the register was recorded, Howat was noted as staying in box 13.
 
Howat is also recorded as having spent some time in the Schonungsbaracke between July 8th 1918 and July 10th.
 
 

George Daniel Howells
 
The Imperial War Museum in London holds a printed membership card for the Ruhleben Model Boat Club for 1917, issued to a G. D. Howells, "the Honorary Secretary, who was aged seventeen in 1914 and was in Germany at the outbreak of the war before being interned in Ruhleben from November 1914 to November 1918". They also hold a printed leave pass issued to Howells (listed as George Howell) by the Ruhleben camp authorities allowing him to visit Berlin, Seegefield, for the day on November 18th 1918. Both items can be located at ID:9496 Misc 60 (915).
 
In June 2008, George's son Philip contacted me to share the following detailed biography on his father, for which I am eternally grateful.
George Daniel Howells (5 January 1897-25 December 1958). At the age of 16 was sent to Berlin by his father, George Jonah Howell(s) (2 November 1871-25 March 1947). The latter was also a prisoner in Ruhleben camp, being held until 1917 when he was exchanged, at the age of 45, for a German held by the British. My father remained for the full four years, having been locked up when he was 17.
 
Father was at St Olave's School in London (now out of London), and was not working particularly hard. Grandfather was a book publisher at the time, and decided to send him to Germany to learn the language, perhaps having thoughts of his joining the business and extending it into Europe. After the war, grandfather founded the picture engraving firm, The Museum Galleries, publishing etchings, mezzotints, etc., and dealing in paintings. He had a gallery on Piccadilly. 
 
George Jonah had a woman cousin who was married to a German glass manufacturer, and they arranged for George Daniel to work with a Berlin firm unpaid, but to learn the language.
 
My father was in digs with a widow, Frau Emma Bahr, whose son, Hans, was at school with a Lambert Kaumanns. Lambert Kaumanns had a sister, Johanna Agnes, who in 1919 became Hannah Howells, and, on 8 January 1922, gave birth to me.
 
In July 1914, the Howells family went to Berlin to see "Georgie", and take him for a seaside holiday on the island of Borkum off Emden. The weather was very fine and sunny. The Howells were therefore very surprised to note that the hotels were emptying so early in August. There was no wireless then, and they did not read German newspapers. Every day they went on the beach and younger brother, Lu, made fine sand castles, planting the Union Flag on them. They had been at war a few days.
 
In due course the police arrived. Grandmother, daughter Doris and young Lu were sent to neutral Holland for repatriation. The two men had to live in Berlin and report to the police station every few days. This lasted until November, when the xenophobic British commenced locking up Germans, so the Germans retaliated. Father and Grandfather were taken to the trotting race track, Ruhleben, at Spandau. The officer who accompanied them led them into a loose stall (to be known as Barack 2), saying, "Well, gentlemen, this is going to be your home for the forseeable future. If I were you, I should get it cleaned up." They shovelled out the horse manure. 
 
Father and mother divorced during the 1940s. He married Nelly Bell, and they had a daughter, Kate, now Mrs Strafford and living in France.
 
PS. Seegefeld became Falkensee - that's where my mother's family were living in 1918. Going from Berlin in those steam train days of the 1920s/30s, I recall we had to change at Spandau. I used to look down at Ruhleben from the train and mother pointed out Barack 2 near the track. Two years ago, I met an English chap who lives in Berlin. He told me the camp site is now a cemetery.

George Daniel Howells, whilst interned at Ruhleben - aged 20

 
 
James Howling
 
James Howling was one of six prisoners released from Ruhleben in October 1917, who made their way to Rotterdam to proceed to England, as reported in The Times of October 5th 1917 ("Imperial and Foreign News", p.7, col. F).
 
 

T. W. Hoydon
 
T. W. Hoydon was listed in The Times of January 8th 1916 ("Released Civilians" p.5, col. D) as one of 69 men released from Ruhleben on Thursday, January 6th, 1916, who subsequently travelled to Flushing for their return trip to England.
 
 

Max Hubner
 
The National Archives in London hold documents at FO 383/25 from 1915 concerning the release of Max Hubner from Ruhleben that year. The doucments also indicate a requirement that Hubner was to remain in Germany.
 
 

Hughes
 
This gentleman named Hughes was a jockey interned in Ruhleben at the beginning of November 1914, as recorded in the Scotsman on 9/11/1914 (p.9), and in The Times of the same day ("British Interned in Germany", p. 7, col. E).
 
 

A. M. D. Hughes
 
A. M. D. Hughes is noted in the Times of November 1st 1915 ("November Reviews", p.5, col.D) as having recently been exchanged from captivity at Ruhleben, and as having written an account of his captivity which was published in The Cornhill.
 
 

Alfred Hughes
 
Alfred Hughes was the mate on the 'Torfrey', originally from 44 Dee Road, The Ferns, Connahsquay, Cheshire, and was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 8. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
Alfred is quite possibly the 'Hughes' named as playing for the Barrack 8 football team against Barrack 20 in the RFA cup final in April 1917, as noted in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917). The first match was a draw, 1-1. In the replay, three days later, Barrack 8 lost, 3-0.
 
 
E. Hughes
 
E. Hughes was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 37 Hood Street, Bootle.
 
An Ernest Hughes appears to have been noted as one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, though the signature is difficult to confirm. The message was postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). It stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
 
 

Richard Hughes
 
From the handbook of the Ruhleben Football Association Season 1915, Richard Hughes was noted as being from 41 Dee Road, Connohs Quai, nr. Chester, and as having been born in Connahs Quai in 1897. He worked as a sailor and was arrested in Hamburg on 16 OCT 1914. After a brief spell impirosned on the hulks in Hamburg, he was sent to Ruhleben, where he was interned in Barrack 8.
 
 
Captain William Nathan Hughes
 
Captain William Nathan Hughes, a Londoner and master of the steamer Auk, of the General Steam Navigation Company, was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, arriving back at Gravesend on January 27th 1917, as noted in the Scotsman newspaper of February 2nd 1917 ("Mercantile Marine Officers Back From Ruhleben", p.3).
 
William Nothan (sic) Hughes was also noted in the Times of January 29th 1917 as one of sixteen men released from Ruhleben ("Changed Conditions in Germany", p.8, col. G).
 
 

F. W. Hughesdon
 
F. W. Hughesdon's contribution to life in the camp is recorded in the Musical Notes section of the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917):
"Mr. Frederick Keel and Mr. F. W. Hughesdon have given genuine pleasure by their singing, of particular interest being Mr. Keel's performance of some beautiful Folk-Tunes from Normandy and Brittany, arranged with admirable ingenuity and perfect taste by MM. Edouard Moulle and Bourgault-Ducoudraye."
 
C. Huggins
 
Sketches by Ruhleben internee C. Huggins were included in an auction at Boulton and Cooper Fine Arts, in the north of England, on September 17th 2008. Huggins' sketches were included in a sketchbook belonging to prisoner John McLaren (many thanks to Fine Arts representative Helen).
 
 

Sir Percy Clarke Hull
 
Sir Percy Clarke Hull was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
The National Archives in London hold documents from 1915 at FO383/27 regarding Percy C. Hull, sub-Canon of Hereford Cathedral, who was interned at Ruhleben. They outline the German Government's refusal to his release as he was not deemed an ecclesiastical.
 
Hull also had the 'honour' to be lampooned by way of a monogram drawn in the sixth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (June 1917), by artist CMAW.
 
The Liddle Collection at Leeds University also holds material on Hull, donated by Lady Hull in November 1977 and September 1979, and now held at RUH 26. These items are a manuscript copy of letter from J. D. Leigh, dated February 17th 1915; three photographs and one postcard, mainly relating to the Freemasons circa 1916 to November 11th 1917, and November 25th 1967; two diaries, from January 1st 1914 to January 9th 1915, and January 10th to November 8th 1915; bound issues of 'In Ruhleben Camp' (June to December 1915, with 'The Ruhleben Bye-Election' (1915) and 'La Vie Francaise de Ruhleben', from April to July 1916; bound issues of 'The Ruhleben Camp Magazine' from March 1916 to June 1917; and a bound edition of 'The Truth About Germany', from September 20th 1914. The online index also tells us that Hull was a clergyman, and Sub-Canon of Hereford Cathedral, and that whilst interned resided in Barrack 8.
 
 

Humphreys
 
Humphreys was one of the Ruhleben prisoners to sign a message of greeting to Sir Edward Letchworth, Grand Secretary of English Freemasons, postmarked December 9th 1914, and printed in the Times of December 28th 1914 (page 3, col. B). The message stated:
"Worshipful Sir & Bro.,
 
We the undersigned brethren, at present interned with other British civilians at the concentration camp at Ruhleben - Spandau, Germany, send hearty good wishes to the Grand Master, officers and brethren in Great Britain, hoping that we may have the pleasure soon of greeting them personally."
This may be the same Humphreys recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 24 Rockfield Road, Anfield, Liverpool.

 

R. Humphries

R. Humphries was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as Delonnaire, Sefton Road, C.-cum-H., Manchester.
 

Hunt
 
Hunt is noted in the first issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magazine (March 1916, p.36) as having given a lecture about Grieg, and having performed and directyed works by Grieg, at the third Arts and Sciences Union musical evening.
 
In the fourth issue of the Ruhleben Camp Magzine (August 1916, p.25), Hunt is listed as to soon be giving a lecture for the Arts and Science Union:
The present arrangements include two lectures by Mr. Short on the Development of Chamber Music, with musical illustrations on each occasion, while Mr. Leigh Henry, Mr. Hunt and Mr. Weber are respectively undertaking similar evenings on works of Debussy, MacDowell and Verdi.
 
H. Hunter
 
H. Hunter was recorded as a member of the Ruhleben Lancastrian Society in the Manchester Guardian of January 15th 1915 (p.12). The article is entitled "Interned in Germany: Lancashire's Civilian Prisoners: Full List of Those Detained at Ruhleben". His address was recorded as 1 Highgate Street, Liverpool.
 
 

Race Hunter
 
A gentleman named Hunter was noted in The Times of December 8th 1915 as having been one of the 160 prisoners released from Ruhleben on the previous day who had travelled by train to Flushing ("Returning Civilians" p.9, col.F).
 
It would seem that this was in fact Race Hunter, whose tragic story was recalled in The Ruhleben Prison Camp: A Record of Nineteen Months Internment", which was later reprinted as apart of "The Ruhleben Prsioners: The Case for their Release" in Februrary 1917" (p.13).
Out of the party of released prisoners that reached Tilbury in January 1916, a man (Mr. Race Hunter) who had succumbed to melancholia, committed suicide by jumping into the Thames.
Many thanks to Jim MacKay for providing this information in December 2007.
 
 

William Edwin Hunter
 
William Edwin Hunter is listed in the surviving register from Barrack 5 at Ruhleben (register number 2), recorded by Neville Stanley Wilkinson in approximately 1916. In the register, Hunter is recorded as having been born on May 11th 1884 in Goole, and is described as having been an engineer prior to his internment. His home address was Claughton House, Goole. At the time the register was recorded, Hunter was noted as staying in loft A, having transferred there from Barrack 14 on April 19th 1915.
 
 
S. Hurry
 
S. Hurry was noted as a chartered accountant on the camp's Finance Committee in a letter he co-authored for the seventh issue of the In Ruhleben Camp magazine (Sep 1915, p.43), regarding the committee's report on the accounts up to June 30th 1915.
 
 

Henry Hutchinson
 
Henry Hutchinson was one of nine men released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Times of January 12th 1917 ("Nine Prisoners Released from Ruhleben", p.5, col. B).
 
 
William Alfred Hutchinson
 
William Alfred Hutchinson was the fisrt engineer on the 'Juno', originally from 2 Mafeking Street, Whitley Bay, and was one of a group of Ruhleben inmates released on March 6th 1918 to England, as noted in files at the National Archives in Kew under accession number MT9/1238. He was interned within Barrack 8. Many thanks to Marcus Bateman.
 
 

Hyde
 
Hyde was released from Ruhleben in January 1917, as reported in the Scotsman newspaper on January 31st 1917 ("British Civilians From Ruhleben", p.6).
 
 

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